The SEC charged a cloud executive with insider trading after he allegedly saved his brothers from $600,000 in losses (QYLS)

Amer Deeba Qualys

  • The SEC charged a former cloud security executive with insider trading on Thursday.
  • Amer Deeba, chief commercial officer at Qualys, allegedly gave his two brothers advanced warning of poor financial results in Q1 2015 and encouraged them to sell all of their shares in the company. 
  • The financial results ultimately tanked the company’s stock 25% the day after earnings, and saved the brothers a total of $581,170, according to the SEC complaint.

A longtime enterprise tech executive was charged with insider trading on Thursday by the Securities and Exchange Commission which alleged that he tipped off his two of his brothers and helped them dump shares in his company ahead of an ugly quarterly earnings report.

Amer Deeba, the defendant, worked at Qualys for 17 years, most recently as chief commercial officer of the cloud security and services company. He had special access to Qualys CEO Philippe Courtot, according to the complaint, and was the only senior executive to sit near Courtot in the office. 

The SEC alleges that Deeba was privy to a significant miss on revenue in the company’s Q1 2015 quarter, and encouraged his brothers to sell of their shares on that information before the company announced its results.

Deeba, who has settled the case without admitting or denying the allegations, will be barred for two years from serving as an executive or director at any SEC-reporting company and will pay a penalty of $581,170 — the amount of losses his tip allegedly saved his brothers.

Courtot called Deeba on April 7 and informed him of the low sales figures, according to the complaint. Deeba, who was in Lebanon with his family at the time of the phone call, allegedly passed this information along to his two brothers. Each held shares in the company thanks to gifts Deeba had issued them in 2005, long before the company’s 2012 IPO.

Qualys’s stock price dropped 25% the day following its May 4 earnings announcement, according to the SEC complaint.

Because they sold their stock ahead of the news, Deeba’s two brothers avoided losing a total of $581,170, according to the complaint. Deeba and Qualys could not immediately be reached for comment.

SEE ALSO: The SEC is accusing a startup founder of stealing $48 million from investors to fund private jets and a dairy cow farm

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Criminal Minds Star Kirsten Vangsness on Her Gender-Bending Role in Marian, or the True Tale of Robin Hood – Parade

Before Kirsten Vangsness returns as fan favorite, tech-kitten Penelope Garcia on the 14th season of Criminal Minds, she is starring in the dual role of Maid Marian and Robin Hood in Theatre of Note’s gender-bending play Marian, or The True Tale of Robin Hood. 

“What I really like about it is it talks about gender identification,” Vangness tells Parade.com in this exclusive interview. “The way that the show presents it is someone says, ‘Hey, I don’t know if I’m a he or a she,’ and everybody goes, ‘What?’ And then they explain themselves and it’s like, ‘Oh, okay. Let’s keep going because those problems are not the big problems in the world.’ Do you know what I mean? We all need to figure out how we choose to identify and then go about the pursuit of our happiness and that’s how the show rolls itself out, which I really appreciate.”

Following is the synopsis:

Marian, or The True Tale of Robin Hood is a gender-bending, patriarchy smashing, hilarious new take on the classic Robin Hood myth. In [author] Adam Szymkowicz’s retelling of the tale, Robin Hood is (and has always been) Maid Marian in disguise, and leads a motley group of Merry Men (a few of whom are actually men) against the greedy Prince John. As the poor get poorer and the rich get richer, who will stand for the vulnerable if not Robin? What is the cost of revealing your true self in a time of trouble? Modern concerns and romantic entanglements clash on the battlefield and on the ramparts of Nottingham Castle. A play about selfishness and selflessness and love deferred and the fight. Always the fight. The fight must go on.

Even before she joined the cast of Criminal Minds, theater was an important part of Vangsness’s life. She talks about that, how she wasn’t first choice for the role of Maid Marian, learning to use a sword, the jeopardy that Penelope Garcia is in when Criminal Minds returns, and more. 

What was it that captured your attention that made you want to take on the role of Marian?

I belong to a theater company in Hollywood called Theatre of NOTE and it was a play that we had picked for the season. I had been in one of the readings, where we just read the play and see if we want to do this show, and I thought it was such a sweet story. It’s a very straightforward retelling of the Robin Hood myth, but it explored gender expression within the mythology and I thought, “I really want to audition for that.”

What was fascinating was I auditioned and I did not get cast. I was like, “Well, it’s okay because that’s what being in a theater company is and that’s what I love about the theater company I am a member of, the art comes first, right?

The director had picked someone else and that person is a wonderful actor and she got another play somewhere else. I was so excited about the play and excited we were doing it, and as an actor you are used to rejection. So, I was like, “Well I guess I didn’t get it,” but I was the second choice. So, when she turned around and told them, “I can’t do it,” I got a phone call saying, “Do you want this part?,” and I was like, “Okay.”

So, I happily did it and what’s been fascinating about it to me is so many things, but one of them is Marian is Maid Marian and she’s also Robin Hood, and as we’ve gone through rehearsal there’s a lot of sword fighting and stage combat. Half the time, I’m in a skirt and batting my eyelashes and the other half of the time, I’m in pants with a broadsword. It’s been super interesting because I saw pictures and some publicity stuff for the show and I had such a strong reaction to looking at my own self doing that because people who look like that, they’re not super heroes.

I’m running around like a super hero, I’m banging around and beating people up and I was like, “Oh, this is exactly what this play is about, it’s about how, if you have curves and you’re a female, you couldn’t possibly do something athletic, but if it was a man, he could be any size and if we see him in a battle with a a weapon his hand, you don’t look at them and go, “Oh, he looks like he’s just a size — fill in the blank. It would be more traditional, casting wise for a show like this, to take a woman that was built like a man and put them in that part because it would be more “believable” for them to be a man.

Are there changes to who Robin is because he is actually Maid Marian?

The way the play is writtenRobin Hood’s been taken prisoner and gets some help to escape. Then once he escapes — I have a costume that basically transforms into a skirt — and we take the hat off — we use the conceit of if the hat is on it’s Robin Hood, if it’s off, it’s Marian, and you buy it.

So, it’s done in a really funny way and the way that the story explains itself is that this is a person who really feels like she isn’t living in a world where she can be all the things that she is unless she is both Robin Hood and Maid Marian.

Most of the Merry Men in our production are played by women pretending to be men and there’s love stories happening all over the place. It can get a little confusing because it does explore gender versus sexuality, which are two totally different things that I’ve had to learn stuff about as I’m doing this play.

I think that that’s one of the neatest things about the human existence is you never stop learning. The second you think, “Oh, I know everything there is to know about people and stuff,” that’s dangerous waters. So, I think it’s really fun to keep exploring all these different things.

What was it like learning to stage fight, or was that a skill you already had?

I did not have that skill at all; it was terrifying. I had to basically double my working out to be able to hold a sword one hand and have it look like it’s just an extension of your own arm. It’s very heavy, so it’s no easy feat, but I can do it now without even blinking an eye. I have sword fights with two people, three people at the same time in this play and I love it. Now, I’ve actually gotten pretty darn good at it and again it’s weird for me to see a feminine body fight like that. It’s weird, but that’s what the show explores.

Robin and Marian are British so, do you have an accent?

Yes. I have two accents, actually. I do a Nottingham, which is a northern accent, and then I do proper London accent for Marian. And, also, this I find really fascinating, it’s so easy for me to be Robin Hood. I can do Robin Hood like nobody’s business. For me to do Robin Hood, is so easy. Like, I get it, I can embody him really easily, where it’s really hard for me to do Maid Marian. I question, “Am I being girly enough?” I am a girl, so it’s really strange.

And you’re a girly girl.

Yeah. But I do my femininity in my own way.

Slip into Criminal Minds for just a minute. We have Garcia in jeopardy with the cliffhanger ending, but what’s really interesting about it, it’s not just that she’s in jeopardy, but she shows a completely different side of herself when she says, “Just shoot her, Spencer.”

I know.

Where’s that coming from?

Well, I think she’s so protective. Basically, that moment is her being like, “Don’t worry about me, worry about you.” That’s not Garcia saying, “You know this one is evil, different than everybody else,” it’s Garcia saying, “I don’t want Reid (Matthew Gray Gubler) to die. So, she’s saying, “Just kill her. Don’t worry about me, just do it.”

As that episode goes on, our season premiere, she and Benjamin Merva (Michael Hogan) have a very intense dislike for each other, and I think it’s hard for Garcia to realize she’s having bad feelings about someone, but she’s also frustrated about the bad things that are happening. It is a very tense episode.

This isn’t the first time Garcia’s been in jeopardy. There was an episode where Morgan (Shemar Moore) had to protect her after she was shot.

Right, but I think the way she processed those traumas was a little different. She definitely comes out of this one with some PTSD. It dfinitely does affect her behavior for at least a few episodes for sure.

So, the season premiere is episode 300. We know that means a lot to you because Criminal Minds pays the bills and allows you to do theater and theater’s a huge part of your life, but what else does it mean to you?

It’s amazing because I was just so happy to get the job for that one day. So, I got a job for a day, I got to put a thing on my resume, and then it got on television so I could prove to people, “Oh, look. I got paid to do the thing I love.”

Now, I get to do it all the time and we’re at 13 seasons. I get to work with people that are so creative, kind and interesting and I’ve learned so much. It’s like television Hogwarts. So, all of that is truly, truly beyond my wildest dreams and it’s very rare, I think, that you get to live your dream, work in a fun place and then on top of all that, there’s like this beautiful, warm, happy, little family cocoon. Usually you have to give something up, right? It’s not a dream job, but there’s security there, or oh, there’s a lot of security, but it’s kind of boring. I am endlessly, endlessly, endlessly, endlessly appreciative of what Criminal Minds has brought to my life.

Will you be co-writing an episode with showrunner Erica Messer this season?

I think so. It’s yet to be determined. I’ve read an interview [with Erica] saying I probably was, so I feel confident telling you I probably am. So, I’m going to say yeah, but right now it’s a little tricky. Since we’re only doing 14, I don’t know exactly where that’s landing and what’s happening. If we end up doing more, then no brainer.

With so many of the cast members directing episodes is that skill you want to take on?

I don’t think I’m built as well for directing, honestly, just processing what everybody else is doing. It’s already a whole hullabaloo when I write a thing and I doubt myself. I feel like in order to be a director … I can lead in certain ways, maybe someday in the future, but not right now.

Marian, or the True Tale of Robin Hood runs through Sept. 23 at the Theatre of Note. Click here for ticket information.

Then, the 14th season premiere of Criminal Minds airs Wednesday, Oct. 3 at 10 p.m. ET/PT on CBS.

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How 'Criminal Minds' Will Address That Cliffhanger in the Season 14 Premiere – TVInsider


Cliff Lipson/CBS

Criminal Minds‘ Season 14 premiere is right around the corner, and it’s also a very special episode for the long-running series — it’s the show’s 300th episode and was written by executive producer Erica Messer.

In the Season 14 premiere, Reid (Matthew Gray Gubler) and Garcia (Kirsten Vangsness) are abducted by cult leader Benjamin Merva (Michael Hogan), aka “The Messiah,” who was leading an organization that recruited people and then groomed them to become serial killers.

And now it’s up to the rest of the BAU to find them before it’s too late. During the search, the team “finds surprising clues in their own history to solve why the two heroes have been targeted by a mass murderer,” according to CBS.

In last year’s finale, it was revealed that VICAP Agent Mary Meadows (Karen David) was involved with the cult, while FBI Agent Owen Quinn (James Urbaniak) was shot and in bad shape. So Reid was left with a Sophie’s Choice — help spring Benjamin or else colleague Garcia was getting a bullet in the head.

Season 14 returns with a few changes as well. At the Television Critics Association summer press tour, CBS revealed that this year the FBI drama will have only 15 episodes and be airing on Wednesday night.

And there’s been no word yet on if its fourteenth will be Minds‘ last season.

Criminal Minds, Season 14 Premiere, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 10/9c, CBS

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Sacha Baron Cohen tried to get OJ Simpson to confess to murder on the 'Who Is America?' finale

OJ

  • Sacha Baron Cohen took on OJ Simpson in the season finale of his Showtime series “Who Is America?”
  • Cohen’s Italian photographer character tried to get Simpson to confess to murder by repeatedly joking about killing his girlfriend. 

Sacha Baron Cohen tried in vain to get OJ Simpson to confess to murder in the season finale of his Showtime series “Who Is America?” on Sunday.

Disguised in the segment as an Italian photographer named Gio Monaldo, Cohen sits down with Simpson in Las Vegas and introduces his girlfriend to Simpson. In an attempt to get her to recognize Simpson, Cohen says Simpson was a Buffalo Bill and an actor in the “Naked Gun” films. The girlfriend doesn’t recognize Simpson — who was found not guilty in the deaths of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman in 1995 — until Cohen makes repeated stabbing motions with his hand.

“She knows that, oh Jesus,” Simpson replies, shaking his head and laughing.

After the girlfriend leaves the room and Simpson calls her “gorgeous,” Cohen makes a series of jokes about killing her in an attempt to get Simpson to agree with him.

“She’s gorgeous, but sometimes I want to kill her,” Cohen says. “I want to send her on a private helicopter and throw her over the Grand Canyon — oopsie daisy!”

Cohen high-fives Simpson, but Simpson laughs and repeatedly says “stop.”

In another hypothetical murder scenario, Simpson goes along with Cohen’s character by saying the girlfriend might go bungee jumping with a cord that’s too long.

The segment concludes with Cohen asking Simpson how he “got away with” his wife’s killing.

“Me and you, we got something in common,” Cohen says. “We both, how you say, ‘ladykillers.'”

“No, I didn’t kill nobody,” Simpson says, laughing.

“Ah, I didn’t either,” Cohen replies.

Watch the episode on Showtime.

SEE ALSO: How OJ Simpson says he would’ve murdered Nicole Brown and Ron Goldman — ‘if’ he did it

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Louis C.K. performed for the first time since admitting to sexual misconduct

22 louis ck netflix.w710.h473.2x

  • Louis C.K. performed at the Comedy Cellar in New York City on Sunday night in what seemed to be his first performance since admitting to sexual misconduct last year, The New York Times reports.
  • In a Times report from November, Louis C.K. was accused of sexual misconduct by five women, some of whom said he masturbated in front of them. He later admitted to the accusations in a statement.

Louis C.K. performed a surprise set at the Comedy Cellar in New York City on Sunday night, a stand-up routine The New York Times reported was “apparently” his first since he admitted to sexual misconduct in November.

The Times reported that the crowd greeted the comedian with an ovation, though the club’s owner, Noam Dworman, reportedly said one audience member called the club afterward to object to the surprise.

Dworman told The Times that the set consisted of “typical Louis C.K. stuff,” which the paper said included racism, waitresses’ tips, and parades. “It sounded just like he was trying to work out some new material, almost like any time of the last 10 years he would come in at the beginning of a new act,” Dworman told The Times.

In a Times report from November, Louis C.K. was accused of sexual misconduct by five women, two of whom said he had masturbated in front of them. He later admitted in a statement that the accusations were “true.”

Louis C.K. subsequently lost his production deal at FX Networks, and the production company The Orchard canceled the release of his feature film “I Love You, Daddy,” which contained controversial subject matter addressing sexual misconduct.

Louis C.K.’s return follows that of the comedian Aziz Ansari, who was accused of sexual misconduct by a woman in January and performed for the first time since the allegations at the Comedy Cellar in May.

SEE ALSO: Sacha Baron Cohen tried to get OJ Simpson to confess to murder on the ‘Who Is America?’ finale

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I'm a lawyer, and Supreme Court justices shouldn't have term limits — they should have age requirements

supreme court

  • Supreme Court justices serve a life term once nominated and confirmed by the US Senate. 
  • Whenever a Supreme Court justice retires or passes away, there is often a political debate about nominations and the court’s ideology.
  • While some think term limits could discourage justices from retiring with political motivations, and encourage fresh perspectives, this is not necessarily the case. 
  • Matthew Stanford, a California attorney, says term limits would not depoliticize the retirement or selection process.
  • Instead, he suggests that age requirements could better solve some of these issues, while maintaining a core feature of the Supreme Court: the relative lack of volatility.

Whenever a Supreme Court justice retires or passes away, the conversation inevitably turns to term limits. As it should: Most voters favor capping justices’ time on the Court, and it has rare bipartisan appeal. Even the current chief justice endorses the idea—or at least he did.

The supposed benefits of term limits are alluring. An 18-year, non-renewable term, for instance, would make vacancies more predictable, granting each president two nominations per term. Assuming nobody dies or retires, no single president could handpick a majority of the Court.

Possible consequences of steady turnover provide additional fodder for term limit proponents: theoretically, term limits would end socially disconnected rulings and politically motivated retirements, and increase the likelihood of a court with an array of ideologies and fresh perspectives.

But let’s consider the possible benefits realistically.

It’s likely that term limits would not prevent politically motivated justices from retiring during a favored administration, even by cutting their own terms short.

In fact, scheduling two vacancies per term could actually make this more appealing. Using the current composition of the Court as an example, consider the following hypothetical:

Justices Ginsburg and Breyer have terms that are set to expire before the 2020 election. Assume that the current administration is expected to lose reelection. Preferring not to have their seats filled by a Democratic president, Justices Thomas and Alito, whose terms will expire after the election, retire early. The outgoing president would get two more nominations at the expense of the next administration.

It’s easy to imagine the political turmoil that would ensue — especially in light of the emergent view that vacancies created in an election year should only be filled after the ballots have been counted.

And plugging this loophole would be tricky. As recent events might suggest, if there were an unexpected vacancy on the court before the end of a presidential term, neither law nor custom could prevent a determined Senate from nominating a candidate that aligns with their ideology and filling that vacancy before the next inauguration. Only a constitutional amendment could do that.

Otherwise, retirement games wouldn’t simply persist; they would worsen. Ironically, term limits would raise the stakes.

Nor is an increase in ideologies or perspectives a given.

Term limits won’t depoliticize the selection process — it won’t prevent either party from using its preferred litmus tests for identifying potential justices. There is already ample concern about nominee reluctance to discuss candidly their legal philosophies at confirmation hearings. Term limits might create predictable vacancies, yet it’s still largely unknown how that could impact prospective nominees

One thing term limits might reduce is the perceived disconnect between the realities of life-tenured justices and ordinary citizens.

But this problem is only partially related to the length of a justice’s term, and it assumes that age is a reliable proxy for social consciousness.

Even if that’s true, most of the blame belongs elsewhere—namely, the custom of nominating Yale and Harvard graduates holding some combination of prestigious practice, judicial, and/or academic positions. Term limits would do little to bridge the gap that makes the Court seem so otherworldly.

Still, the term limit discussion does raise an important consideration: modern life expectancies. Though undeniably a good thing, longer lifespans mean longer terms for justices. As Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean at Berkeley Law and a constitutional law scholar, explained in The New Republic:

“Life expectancy is dramatically longer today than when the Constitution was written in 1787. The result is that Supreme Court justices are serving ever longer, with the last four to leave the court having served, on average, for 28 years. This trend is continuing with the current court. Clarence Thomas was 43 when he was appointed, and John Roberts and Elena Kagan were each 50 at the time of their appointments. If these justices serve until they are 90–the age at which Justice John Paul Stevens retired–they will have been on the bench for upwards of four decades apiece.”

Even assuming, as Chemerinsky seems to suggest, that longer terms are somehow antithetical to our constitutional system, a more modest revision would address this concern, and it would do so without sacrificing the judicial independence that motivated the Founders to include life tenure in Article III of the Constitution.

In fact, other provisions of the Constitution already include such a safeguard: age requirements.

One must be 35 years old to run for President or Vice President, 30 for Senator, and 25 for Representative. (Whether those numbers ought also to be lifted is a discussion for another day.)

If providing a counterbalance to longer life expectancies is the core rationale for term limits, a minimum age—perhaps 60 or 65 years old—could accomplish this without the unintended consequences that term limits threaten.

It also would likely be an easier reform to implement. Although a constitutional amendment would be the most ironclad approach, a statute or even a custom establishing age requirements would likely suffice.

Finally, term limits would eliminate a consequence of life tenure, intended or not, that has become a unique, arguably essential feature of our constitutional republic: the relative lack of volatility, for which the Court is valued.

The Court is insulated from more direct forms of democracy. The elevated role of precedent in the work of the Court underscores this point. Even as the Founders were careful to avoid establishing anything resembling the British Crown, they nevertheless included life tenure in the 1787 Constitution. They presumably understood this to mean that justices and judges alike would largely remain in office for the remainders of their careers. Yet they included it anyway. Age, it would seem, was seen as an asset to the work of the judiciary, a feature of judicial independence rather than an oversight only recently brought into focus by improved life expectancies.

Term limits would abolish this feature despite their more modest purpose. A minimum age requirement would not.

The United States has the oldest written constitution still in use today. It is not enough to demand term limits simply because we are the only democracy that extends life tenure to its judiciary.

Before we proceed to jettison the order of constitutional elders that life tenure has effectively molded within our courts over the past 229 years, we would be wise to consider this less drastic alternative.

Matthew Stanford is a California attorney and Senior Research Fellow at the California Constitution Center. He is a graduate of Berkeley Law and Penn State University.

SEE ALSO: Here’s an evolving count of which senators are voting for Trump’s Supreme Court pick

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Robert Mueller once started a new job by asking every supervisor in the office to resign

robert mueller

  • The special counsel Robert Mueller once started a new job by giving many of his employees a rude awakening.
  • After being appointed the US Attorney for the Northern District of California in 1998, Mueller asked every supervisor in the office to resign, according to a profile from The New York Times published on Saturday.
  • Mueller’s decision was reportedly rooted in a management philosophy he learned as a Marine platoon commander during the Vietnam War: It’s impossible to get people to perform beyond their capabilities.
  • Instead of nagging the office’s existing employees to do better, Mueller chose to hire the best employees he could find, despite the risks involved with creating instability shortly into his tenure.

The special counsel Robert Mueller once started a new job by giving many of his employees a rude awakening.

In 1998, Mueller was appointed the US Attorney for the Northern District of California. Near the beginning of his tenure, he asked every supervisor in the office to resign, according to a profile from The New York Times published on Saturday. Mueller then reportedly sent an email to everyone in the Justice Department with listings for each major prosecution job in his district.

Mueller’s decision reportedly bothered many of his employees, but according to The Times, it was rooted in a management philosophy Mueller learned as a Marine platoon commander during the Vietnam War: It’s impossible to get people to perform beyond their capabilities.

Instead of nagging the office’s existing employees to do better, Mueller chose to hire the best employees he could find, despite the risks involved with creating instability shortly into his tenure.

Mueller is currently leading an investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election, and his previous managerial style may give some insight into the team of prosecutors he has put together to assist him.

Mueller has assembled a formidable team of experienced litigators and investigators, some of whom have drawn the ire of President Donald Trump and his allies due to their previous campaign donations to Democrats.

Trump occasionally tweets about the team, referring to them as “13 angry Democrats,” though some have also donated to Republicans.

So far, the investigation has led to charges against four Americans who were once associated with President Donald Trump’s campaign or administration, including Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, who was found guilty on eight federal counts of bank and tax fraud on Tuesday.

Russian nationals, intelligence officers, and companies have also been indicted by Mueller’s team.

SEE ALSO: Here’s everyone who has been charged and convicted in Mueller’s Russia probe so far

DON’T MISS: Meet the all-star team of lawyers Robert Mueller has working on the Trump-Russia investigation

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Robert Mueller is a demanding boss who makes employees work nights and weekends

Robert Mueller

  • The special counsel Robert Mueller is a demanding boss, according to a profile from The New York Times published on Saturday.
  • Mueller reportedly expects his employees to work late nights and weekends.
  • He also reportedly has little patience for those who aren’t prepared for meetings.

The special counsel Robert Mueller is a demanding boss who requires his employees be fully prepared for meetings and work long hours, according to a profile from The New York Times published on Saturday.

The Times reports that the prosecutors working under Mueller on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election work late nights and weekends. According to the publication, Mueller’s expectations aren’t new.

As a US attorney, he would reportedly walk around the office early in the morning and during the evening to see who was working. And during his tenure as the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, he received two briefings each day, which made agents and analysts work grueling and unconventional schedules, according to The Times.

The Times also reports that Mueller has little patience for those who aren’t prepared for meetings.

“The thing that would set him off was when someone would come in for a briefing unprepared,” John S. Pistole, a former deputy FBI director, told The Times. “Or worse, come in unprepared and act like they were prepared.”

Efficiency is a priority for Mueller, who conducts short, 15-minute meetings with no small talk, and expects prosecutors to work quickly, according to The Times.

So far, the investigation led by Mueller into election interference has resulted in charges against four Americans who were once associated with President Donald Trump’s campaign or administration, including Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, who was found guilty on eight federal counts of bank and tax fraud on Tuesday.

Russian nationals, intelligence officers, and companies have also been indicted by Mueller’s team.

SEE ALSO: Here’s everyone who has been charged and convicted in Mueller’s Russia probe so far

DON’T MISS: Meet the all-star team of lawyers Robert Mueller has working on the Trump-Russia investigation

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Criminal Minds Stars Are Doing More Behind The Scenes In Season 14 – Cinema Blend

3 days ago

Season 14 of Criminal Minds may have a reduced episode count (for now anyway), but that doesn’t mean its cast will be working any less either in front of the camera or behind the scenes. In fact, some might be working more than they have in the past, with showrunner Erica Messer saying many from the show’s cast are earning director credits in the upcoming season. Impressively enough, the cast’s directorial contributions will account for one-third of Season 14’s episode helmers.

Directing will be old hat and presumably a blast for some of the Criminal Minds cast. Stars like Matthew Gray Gubler and Joe Mantegna will direct their twelveth and ninth episodes, respectively. Aisha Tyler and Adam Rodriguez don’t have quite as much experience as Gubler and Mantegna, and each will take directing on for a second time this season. Meanwhile, A.J. Cook will make her directing debut in Season 14, which showrunner Erica Messer told TVLine is a “huge family affair.”

Other Criminal Minds cast members will also be getting in on behind-the-scenes work in other capacities, as Erica Messer confirmed star Kirsten Vangsness will more than likely write another episode in Season 14. Vangsness and Messer have co-written one episode a season ever since Season 10, and while the showrunner couldn’t officially confirm that it will happen again in the new season, she would know better than most. Vangsness’ name has not been listed in the writing credits for the first four episodes of the season, so if she does end up co-writing an episode, it will obviously be later in the season.

The slew of cast members pitching in to help out behind the scenes on Criminal Minds Season 14 is impressive, and it’s possible everyone is going the extra mile in an attempt to get more episodes tacked onto the end of the season. It’s definitely impressive that one-third of the upcoming episodes will be directed by various cast members, though fans might be even more impressed if the season gets the standard 20+ episode season, even if it means the cast’s contribution statistic takes a bit of a hit. Erica Messer said Season 14 getting more than 15 episodes still isn’t out of the question, but that she’s only planning for 15 episodes in terms of the season’s storytelling.

Criminal Minds will return to CBS for its Season 14 premiere, its 300th episode, on Wednesday, October 3, at 10:00 p.m. ET. For a breakdown of all the shows headed to television in the coming months, be sure to visit and bookmark our summer and fall premiere guides. For more on Criminal Minds, check out what Kirsten Vangsness thought of that crazy cliffhanger in Season 13.

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Giuliani the Prosecutor Would've Called This Obstruction – Bloomberg

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