Andrew McCabe memo recalls conversation with Rod Rosenstein in which the deputy attorney general reportedly revealed Trump wanted him to mention Russia in statement on James Comey's firing

Andrew McCabe

  • Former deputy FBI director Andrew McCabe documented a conversation with deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein, in which Rosenstein reportedly indicated President Donald Trump wanted him to mention Russia in a statement on the firing of then-FBI director James Comey.
  • Rosenstein pointed to Comey’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation as the reasoning for Comey’s dismissal in May 2017.
  • According to a New York Times report published Wednesday, McCabe wrote a memo expressing concern that Rosenstein could have provided cover to Trump by not mentioning Russia in the statement on Comey’s firing
  • It was not immediately clear what Trump reportedly wanted Rosenstein to say about Russia in the statement that was used to justify Comey’s firing — but afterward, Trump claimed that Comey told him he was not personally under investigation in the Russia probe.
  • The circumstances surrounding these events are part of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. 

Former deputy FBI director Andrew McCabe was concerned about remarks Rod Rosenstein reportedly made regarding the justification for James Comey’s firing as director of the FBI.

After Comey was dismissed in May 2017, Rosenstein revealed that President Donald Trump wanted him to mention Russia in the statement outlining reasons for Comey’s firing, The New York Times reported on Wednesday.

According to the newspaper, McCabe thought Rosenstein’s comment suggested that he gave cover to Trump by not mentioning Russia in the statement on Comey. McCabe wrote a memo documenting the conversation.

Comey’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation was cited as the official reason for his termination.

The circumstances surrounding these events are part of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, which has been ongoing since Mueller was appointed, shortly after Comey was fired. Among other things, Mueller’s team is looking into whether Trump obstructed justice at any point since taking office.

It was not immediately clear what Trump reportedly wanted Rosenstein to say about Russia in that Comey statement. But Trump, in his letter to Comey, thanked him for saying he was not under investigation in the Russia probe.

Trump would mention Russia several more times in later conversations about Comey’s firing, including during an NBC News interview and during a closed-door Oval Office meeting with some Russian diplomats..

McCabe, who was fired in March amid an internal investigation by the Office of the Inspector General, hinted that he was dismissed “because of the role I played, the actions I took, and the events I witnessed in the aftermath of the firing of James Comey.”

“This has to be seen in the larger context,” McCabe said in a statement in March. “And I firmly believe that this is an ongoing effort to undermine my credibility because of the work that I did on the Russia case, because of the investigations that I oversaw and impacted that target this administration.”

“They have every reason to believe that I could end up being a significant witness in whatever the special counsel comes up with,” McCabe said. “And so they are trying to create this counter-narrative that I am not someone who can be believed or trusted.”

SEE ALSO: Trump reportedly lobbied Jeff Sessions to retake control of the Russia probe — making Sessions a key witness in the investigation

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Protesters in San Francisco dumped a huge pile of scooters in the street and blocked 11 tech buses — and then things got tense

google scooter protest housing san francisco silicon valley 6

  • Anti-tech demonstrators in San Francisco blocked tech buses with piles of electric scooters.
  • They told Business Insider they were protesting tech companies’ using city streets to experiment and city officials’ increasing use of sweeps to force homeless people off the streets.
  • In total, a full intersection, 11 buses, and several cars were blocked for about two hours. 

Anti-tech demonstrators in San Francisco on Thursday used piles of electric scooters to block shuttles ferrying Google and other tech company employees to work. The blockade was to protest what they see as the failure of the tech industry and lawmakers to address the city’s income inequality and sizable homeless population.

“What you’re seeing here is that scooters have more rights than people,” Chirag Bhakta told Business Insider. “Our priorities shouldn’t be people first, scooters second. We’re tired of being seen as an experimental playground for the tech industry.”

The deluge of dockless electric scooters that have cropped up in San Francisco and other cities in recent months have drawn criticism from officials who say they were given little to no warning about their presence, as well as from activists who say the scooters are a prime example of tech companies entering public spaces without getting input from residents or permission from regulators.

Business Insider was on the scene. Here’s what the scooter protest looked like:

SEE ALSO: Electric scooter startup Bird reportedly raises $150 million, making it the first $1 billion scooter startup

At about 8:45 a.m., protesters carried scooters to an intersection in San Francisco’s Mission District with the intention of blocking shuttles carrying Google employees.

Activists piled scooters in front of buses and unfurled signs that said “Techsploitation is toxic.”

San Francisco’s controversial scooter invasion has been spearheaded by three venture-backed companies, Bird, LimeBike, and Spin. These services allow people to reserve a nearby scooter via a smartphone app, ride around on it for a small fee, and at the end of the journey leave it anywhere to be claimed by the next rider.

To make their point that big tech is toxic, protesters dressed in white hazmat suits and masks.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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