Crimes and Their Punishments – Through the Ages

Punishments for Crimes through the ages – from the bizarre to outrageous, from the sublime to the ridiculous. We don’t know how lucky we are!

Many of us are apt to complain about sentences handed out by our Courts for crimes these days – too harsh, too lenient. But a quick look at some punishments for crimes through the ages, including in some countries today, we should really consider how much we really have to complain about.

Not only have punishments been truly shocking (and in some instances still are), but even some of the crimes are truly unbelievable.

Many Sydney criminal lawyers would have had their work cut out for them if some of these historical crimes were still on the statute books! Lucky for us that our complaints about the justice systems these days are limited to whether an offender should be given a jail sentence or community service, or whether a 2 year sentence is sufficient or whether 5 would have been better, and so on.

Thank goodness we don’t have to contend with crimes for which the penalty is being tortured to death by some truly unimaginable means. Criminal lawyers in Australia, as in Europe, the United States, Canada, New Zealand and others, these days don’t have to plead for the type of mercy that offenders of times gone by had to. And of course, some of these barbaric practices do still exist today in other parts of the globe, as you can see below.

Some Crimes and Some Punishments You Won’t Believe

Take a look …

Crimes and Their Punishments

Exclusive Criminal Minds Sneak Peek: Prentiss Will Stop at Nothing to Help Reid – TV Guide (blog)

Reid could sure use a helping hand now that he’s been arrested on suspicion of murder. Luckily, Prentiss is extending one.

In our exclusive sneak peek at Wednesday’s Criminal Minds, Prentiss (Emily Prentiss) wants to hook Reid (Matthew Gray Gubler) up with her old friend, prominent defense attorney Fiona Duncan (Jeananne Goossen), since his rogue Mexico trip rendered him ineligible for the FBI’s legal assistance.

“Emily, I really appreciate it, but helping me could destroy your reputation in the bureau,” Reid says.

Because she’s the world’s greatest boss, Prentiss tells him: “My battle, my choice. Please let me help you.”

Criminal Minds boss on Reid’s “heartbreaking” predicament

Spoiler alert! He does. Showrunner Erica Messertold TVGuide.com that Goossen will be around for “number of episodes” trying to get Reid out of this pickle.

“The big question in [Wednesday’s] episode is, will he plead guilty or not guilty, and what would that mean?” Messer said. “How could he plead guilty to something he has no clear memory of? His moral code says he never would’ve done that. And his FBI agent side is like, don’t admit to something you didn’t do. And yet if he does that, he’ll get a lighter sentence and all that stuff. Do you make that deal with the devil? Or do you take your chances on being proven innocent?”

Criminal Minds airs Wednesdays at 9/8c on CBS.

(Full disclosure: TVGuide.com is owned by CBS.)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Facing 40 criminal charges, Orange horse farm owner fires lawyer – Fredericksburg.com

#ndn-video-player-1.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px;

#ndn-video-player-2.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px;

The embezzlement case against Anne Williams stalled Friday in circuit court after she abruptly fired her primary attorney and an associate lawyer quit the case that alleges the misuse of large sums of money intended for the care of animals through the defendant’s now nonexistent horse rescue effort.

Orange County Circuit Judge Daniel Bouton issued a stern warning to the 58-year-old Williams, though saying he was not accusing her of doing anything wrong.

“I don’t want you to think you can just go through attorney after attorney after attorney to try and delay, delay and delay the proceedings,” the judge said of the three lawyers she went through in the last 16 months. “There will come a time when we have to balance your rights with the need to move this case forward.”

Associate attorney Michael Hu Young of Richmond appeared in court Friday ready to argue several defense motions he had drafted for Williams, but instead ended up filing a motion to withdraw as her counsel, which Bouton granted. Young said he rarely quits a case.

“I’m old school—I stay on a case until the final decision,” Young said.

In this case, he said his firm asked him to stop representing Williams because of its financial focus and the fact that he had not served as her primary counsel. Alexandria attorney John Zwerling was in that role until Williams dismissed him.

“The problem that led to me firing Mr. Zwerling only occurred last night,” Williams said Friday morning, pressed by the judge about why she didn’t have an attorney.

Orange attorney Thomas Purcell acted as her original lawyer when she was arrested Oct. 26, 2015, in a separate but related case charging Williams with 27 misdemeanor counts of animal cruelty. Those charges came after the Orange County Sheriff’s Office reported finding more than 100 horses, cats, dogs and other animals starving, dying, sick or dead at Williams’ Peaceable Farms in Somerset.

Purcell no longer represents Williams either; she is set to face the animal cruelty charges at trial March 31 in Orange County General District Court.

Williams was re-arrested March 28, 2016, on 13 felony counts of embezzlement carrying a maximum sentence of 260 years in the state penitentiary, according to court records. She remains free on $100,000 bond.

Bouton advised her Friday to get a new attorney quickly.

“You are here in circuit court on some very serious charges without an attorney,” the judge said, adding, “You certainly have the means to afford counsel.”

Bouton ordered her to be back in circuit court April 3 with her new attorney or a letter from the attorney indicating representation, and she agreed that she would.

#ndn-video-player-3.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px;

2 doctors face up to 20 years in prison for running a $40 million opioid 'pill mill'

fentanyl heroin

Two Alabama doctors face up to 20 years in prison for running an opioid “pill mill” out of their two mobile clinics.

On Thursday Dr. Xiulu Ruan and Dr. John Patrick Couch were found guilty of over-prescribing addictive and sometimes deadly pain killers to their patients, receiving illegal kickbacks from drugmaker Insys Therapeutics, and engaging in insurance fraud.

The doctors were arrested back in 2015 in an ongoing, wide-ranging investigation called “Operation Pilluted,” federal law enforcement’s answer to the America’s precription drug epidemic.

Insys makes fentanyl, one of the opioids Couch and Ruan were pushing on patients who didn’t need them. In fact, it’s only supposed to be prescribed to cancer patients.

Other drugs the doctors pushed included oxycodone (brand name: Oxycontin), oxycodone hydrochloride (brand name: Roxicodone), oxymorphone (brand name: Opana), hydromorphone (brand name: Dilaudid), morphine, and methadone, according to the Department of Justice.

A big reason why this was all possible was because the doctors owned their own pharmacy called C&R Pharmacy. There, patients were able to fill prescriptions over and over again without anyone batting an eye. 

At the same time, doctors were ripping off health insurance companies by ordering patients to take unnecessary, expensive urine tests. They also would claim that doctors had seen patients when they had actually been seen by nurse practitioners. Claiming that a doctor had seen a patient made the session more expensive.

The entire two month trial wasn’t just about fraud either, it was about a culture of drug addiction. Not only were the patients being over-prescribed opioids, but employees at the clinics were also stealing them and taking them on the job too, according to the government’s complaint.

Both Ruan and Couch made around $40 million with this scam. They will now have to pay the government $5 million in cash and give up property purchased with their ill gotten gains. Ruan also forfeited 20 luxury sports cars including two Ferraris and two Lamborghinis, according to the WSJ. They will be sentenced sometime in May.

fentanyl CDC chart 1

Insisting on damage

There’s another feature of the drug industry on trial here too, and that’s the practice of pharmaceutical companies paying doctors to make speeches endorsing their products.

Back in February of 2016, an Insys sales rep named Natalie Perhacs pled guilty to paying kickbacks to Couch and Ruan. She disguised those payments as speaker fees as part of the company’s speakers bureau of doctors, and said she was under constant pressure from management to book the doctors for speaking engagements.

Perhacs also testified that company executives met with the doctors back in 2014.

A year later, a Connecticut nurse practitioner participating in the speakers bureau pled guilty to engaging in a similar kickback scheme with Insys.

Jonathan Roper (2nd L), a former Insys Therapeutics Inc district sales manager, and Fernando Serrano (C), a former sales representative at the company walk with Serrano’s lawyer, Jude Cardenas (R), out of federal court after they pleaded not guilty to engaged in a scheme to pay doctors kickbacks to prescribe a fentanyl-based drug the company sells, in Manhattan, New York, U.S., August 17, 2016. Others not identified. REUTERS/Nate RaymondAnd back in December, 10 former employees including the company’s former CEO, who met with Ruan and Couch, were arrested on charges of racketeering, paying kick backs, and insurance fraud.

For Insys, none of this over — not by a long shot. Here are a bunch of ongoing investigations the company disclosed in its annual report:

State Related Investigations. We have received CIDs from each of the Office of the Attorney General of the State of Arizona, ODOJ, the Attorney General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Office of the Attorney General of Illinois and we have also received a subpoena from the Chief Consumer Protection and Antitrust Division of the State of New Hampshire.

In addition, we understand that numerous physicians practicing in New Jersey have received subpoenas from the Department of Justice of the State of New Jersey in connection with these physicians’ interactions with our company. These CIDs and subpoenas request documents regarding Subsys, including our sales and marketing practices related to Subsys in the applicable state, as well as our patient services hub. We are cooperating with each of these investigations and have produced documents in response to these CIDs and related requests for information from each office.

Oh, and the company also received requests from the “USAO of Eastern District of Michigan, Rhode Island, Florida (Jacksonville), Connecticut, New Hampshire, Southern District of Alabama regarding specific physicians that we have interacted with in those states.”

So if you things are ugly now, just wait.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: How billionaire hedge fund titan Steve Cohen walked away from the biggest insider trading scandal in history

Source link

'Criminal Minds' Season 12 Episode 15 Spoilers: Reid Gets Beat Up? BAU Agent Might Find an Ally in Cellmate – Christian Post

Reid (Matthew Gray Gubler) might want to get comfortable in prison because he might be there for a while. The next episode of “Criminal Minds” season 12, however, will show this will be no easy task.

YouTube/CBSA screenshot from the promo for “Criminal Minds” season 12, episode 15, “Alpha Male.”

In episode 15, “Alpha Male,” the Behavioral Analysis Unit’s (BAU) resident genius becomes the target of a group of big, brawny prisoners, who are looking to welcome the newcomer the only way they know how — giving him a good beating.

Thankfully, Reid’s cellmate (Harold Perrineau) briefs him up on how things are done in the prison. “You gotta learn how to survive,” he tells Reid in the promo for “Criminal Minds” season 12, episode 15.

However, it is unclear how he will be of help. The group of prisoners is seen bearing down on Reid in the preview just after the lights went off.

This has fans worried about Reid’s life in “Criminal Minds” season 12, episode 15. Many do not want to see Gubler’s character go, especially having dealt with the exit of both Shemar Moore and Thomas Gibson, but fans would want to focus on the presence of Perrineau here.

Last month, it was announced that the “Oz” alum will be part of “Criminal Minds” season 12 in a recurring role. Perrineau plays a former FBI agent named Calvin Shaw, who is in the same situation as Reid is for killing one of his informants.

Reid’s BAU friends will figure out if he is a friend or a foe. For now, as seen in “Criminal Minds” season 12, episode 15, he appears to be very helpful to Reid and might even help him with his prison bully situation.

Whether he has his own intentions or is simply looking to assist a fellow out (after all, Shaw and Reid both have a connection to the FBI), remains a mystery for now.

Back at the office, the BAU members, who are still looking for ways to help Reid, will also investigate attacks by an UnSub who disfigures the faces of his young victims with acid.

“Criminal Minds” season 12, episode 15, “Alpha Male,” airs Wednesday, March 1, at 9 p.m. ET on CBS.

[embedded content]

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Facing 40 criminal charges, Anne Williams fires lawyer – The Daily Progress

#ndn-video-player-1.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; #ndn-video-player-2.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px;

ORANGE—The embezzlement case against Anne Williams stalled Friday in circuit court after she abruptly fired her primary attorney and an associate lawyer quit the case that alleges the misuse of large sums of money intended for the care of animals through the defendant’s now nonexistent horse rescue.

Orange County Circuit Court Judge Daniel Bouton issued a stern warning to 58-year-old Williams though saying he was not accusing her of doing anything wrong.

“I don’t want you to think you can just go through attorney after attorney after attorney to try and delay, delay and delay the proceedings,” the judge said of the three lawyers she went through in the last 16 months. “There will come a time when we have to balance your rights with the need to move this case forward.”

Associate attorney Michael Hu Young of Richmond appeared in court Friday ready to argue several defense motions he had drafted for Williams, but instead ended up filing a motion to withdraw as her counsel, which Bouton granted. Young said he rarely quits a case.

“I’m old school—I stay on a case until the final decision,” Young said.

In this case, he said his firm asked him to stop representing Williams because of its financial focus and the fact that he has not served as her primary counsel like Alexandria attorney John Zwerling had.

“The problem that led to me firing Mr. Zwerling only occurred last night,” Williams said Friday morning, pressed by the judge about why she didn’t have an attorney.

Orange attorney Thomas Purcell acted as her original lawyer when she was arrested Oct. 26, 2015, in the separate but related case charging Williams with 27 misdemeanor counts of animal cruelty. In the fall of that year, the Orange County Sheriff’s Office reported finding more than 100 horses, cats, dogs and other animals starving, dying, sick or dead at Williams’ former animal rescue, Peaceable Farms, in Somerset.

Purcell no longer represents Williams either; she is set to face the animal cruelty charges at trial March 31 in Orange County General District Court.

Williams was rearrested March 28, 2016, on 13 felony counts of embezzlement carrying a maximum sentence of 260 years in the state penitentiary, according to court records. She remains free on $100,000 bond.

Bouton advised her Friday to get a new attorney very quickly, and to establish a good working relationship with that person.

“You are here in circuit court on some very serious charges without an attorney,” the judge said, adding, “You certainly have the means to afford counsel.”

Bouton ordered her to be back in circuit court April 3 with her new attorney or a letter from the attorney indicating representation, and she agreed that she would.

Peaceable Farms finances

According to court records, Peaceable Farms started as a federally-recognized nonprofit in 2011 in Barnesville, Maryland “to be operated exclusively for the prevention of cruelty to animals” and as a horse rescue and sanctuary program. Williams, then Anne Goland, was elected president of the board and her then-husband, Anthony Goland, was named secretary and treasurer of Peaceable Farms.

In 2011, contributions to the animal rescue totaled $696,582, according to court records.

In 2012, $1.055 million was donated to Peaceable Farms—including nearly $668,000 given by Anne and Anthony Goland along with various other donors giving as much as $100,000 and lesser amounts in the thousands of dollars, according to court records. Also that year, the horse rescue moved to Orange County, occupying a scenic piece of countryside in Somerset, just off Route 231 neighboring the farm with Virginia’s largest corn maze.

Donations to Peaceable Farms reached $1.1 million in 2013, a total that included another $772,000 from the Golands, according to court records, and various other donors making up the difference. By 2014, the organization’s total income was $3.7 million, tax records showed.

Court documents from the first three years of Peaceable Farms included detailed logs showing multiple large purchases of hay, feed, veterinary services and various other services associated with running an animal rescue and farm. In at least one tax year, the nonprofit showed balanced expenses and income.

In 2015, Anthony and Anne Goland ended their marriage, the divorce decree made final on July 29 – just a few months before Orange County sheriff’s deputies discovered the reportedly deplorable state of Peaceable Farms in what the sheriff described at the time as a case of animal hoarding.

The alleged embezzlement of Peaceable Farms funds occurred between 2012 and 2015—during the defendant’s marriage to Anthony Goland—when she reportedly wrote checks for her own use on at least 13 separate occasions, court records said. At that time, Williams had access to more than $5 million, including more than $3 million in donations, according to court records.

Defense motions not argued yet

Following her arrest in 2015, Williams, banned from returning to her Somerset farm and ordered to surrender her passport, went to live with an aunt in Culpeper. She’s since lived in Charlottesville and rented a room in a Warrenton motel. According to court records, Williams now lives in Glen Allen.

One of the several defense motions Young had planned to argue Friday involved the motel room and a “confidential” police tip that Williams had allegedly “secreted” one or more cats in it after being court ordered not to acquire anymore animals, according to court records.

Acting on the tip, Orange County Sheriff’s Capt. W.O. Hayes went to the motel room in Warrenton on March 31, 2016, three days after Williams was arrested and still in jail.

Motel management informed Hayes that Williams’ reservation had expired and they were about to remove all of her items for placement in storage. The sheriff’s captain then entered the motel room and viewed three banker’s boxes of documents and tax records, according to court records. Later that night, attorney Purcell showed up and paid the motel bill.

The next day, Hayes returned with a search warrant. Court records did not mention the presence of any cats.

Young’s motion was to suppress any evidence seized from the motel room, claiming that Hayes made illegal entry. The commonwealth, in a motion to deny the defense motion, argued Williams waived her right to warrantless search and seizure as one of her bail conditions.

Young’s motion said she only waived her rights to ensure compliance with those conditions “and not to allow law enforcement officers unfettered access to her motel room or personal belongings to investigate and look for evidence of additional crimes or to trample her 4th amendment rights as they pleased.”

Another defense motion Young did not argue Friday was to exclude from evidence at trial any communications Williams had with her husband during their marriage. The commonwealth argued those communications occurred during the alleged embezzlement and therefore are not confidential.

Finally, Young did not argue a third motion seeking to exclude any evidence of animal abuse because it would be “uniquely inflammatory” and is irrelevant to the embezzlement case, according to court records.

The commonwealth, in a motion to deny, said the animal cruelty charges “tend to prove the essential element of wrongful appropriations of funds. Instead of using these funds to care for the animals, the defendant wrongfully used the funds for her own purposes.”

#ndn-video-player-3.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px;

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Mexico's retaliation against Trump may be taking shape

Mexico protest against Donald Trump Pena Nieto government

President Donald Trump has railed against Mexico since early in his presidential campaign, criticizing the US’s southern neighbor over matters of trade, immigration, and security.

Since his election in November, Trump has largely maintained his hardline policies toward Mexico, with US-Mexico relations ever more strained as a result.

The Mexican government is reportedly weighing economic and trade measures to counter Trump’s aggressive posture.

But should President Enrique Peña Nieto decide to strike back through other means, there are a number of avenues he could pursue.

US cooperation with Mexico on security matters has played an important role in Mexico’s efforts to fight crime. Plan Merida, enacted in 2008, has provided the Mexican government $2.5 billion in funding, as well as training and equipment like Black Hawk helicopters. (Those resources are thought to have facilitated abuses as well.)

Mexico, however, has played an essential role in a number of initiatives vital to US interests. This includes not only drug interdiction and pursuit of organized-crime suspects, but intercepting and deporting the significant number of migrants from Central America who cross Mexico heading for the US.

Mexico is unlikely to halt its own fight against drugs and crime, but it could reduce or halt cooperation with the US on these programs.

Donald Trump Enrique Pena Nieto Mexico meeting

“They could throw open the ports entry southbound and just let guns and cash flow in without inspection. They could make no effort to control the southern border. They could make a secret pact with drug-trafficking organizations. They could provide false intelligence, or no intelligence to the United States, in contrast to what they have been doing before,” said David Shirk, a professor at the University of San Diego who researches crime and violence in Mexico.

“They could do any number of things to undermine the security of the United States. I don’t think Mexico is likely to do those things because of the obvious negative ramifications,” Shirk said, but there are “certainly many ways in which losing Mexico as an ally on security would be bad for the United States.”

What, if any, official adjustment the Mexican government makes regarding security cooperation remains to be seen, but discussions about such changes are not just idle speculation.

“The drugs that come through Mexico from South America, or the drugs that are produced here in Mexico, all go to the United States. This is not our problem,” Jorge Castañeda, who served as Mexico’s foreign minister from 2000 to 2003, told CNN at the end of January.

Colin Powell Jorge Castaneda Mexico US foreign minister secretary of state

“We have been cooperating with the United States for many years on these issues because they’ve asked us to, and because we have a friendly, trustful relationship.”

“If that relationship disappears,” Castañeda said, “the reasons for cooperation also disappear.”

Much of the cooperation on security matters hinges on personal, on-the-ground relationships between Mexican agents and officials and their US counterparts.

These Mexicans may not give the orders, but they don’t live and work in a vacuum.

“There’s a great deal of individuals in both the military and the federal police, but I would say probably more so with the military, that are extraordinarily angered by everything going on with the Trump presidency,” Mike Vigil, former chief of international operations for the US Drug Enforcement Administration, told Business Insider.

“And they have started to express disdain in terms of having to work with the US government based on that,” Vigil said, adding:

“There’s a lot people that’ve been expressing a reluctance moving forward, and that reluctance is becoming stronger and stronger as Trump continues to make remarks and continue with the deportation of not necessarily criminals, they don’t have a problem with criminals, they understand that, but when they’re separating Hispanic or Mexican families, women, mothers, fathers, who have absolutely nothing to do with any criminal activities. That is the arrow that pierces the heart of Mexican security forces.”

Vigil stressed that friendships between Mexican and US officials may keep cooperation alive, but slights and insults from Trump may accumulate in the minds of Mexican security personnel until some have little motivation to act on tips or intelligence offered by the US. As Vigil explained:

“If you provide tactical information — let’s say John Doe, or Juan Doe, is up here in, let’s say, San Miguel de Allende, and we know what house he’s in, we know he’s definitely there — you pass it on to the Mexicans.”

“They may not tell you ‘no,’ but they’ll just drag their feet, and they’ll let a lot of time pass by where the individual may have already moved, and that way … you don’t have a grievance. They’re going to say, ‘The guy wasn’t there.'”

Central American immigrants

Amid Trump’s looming crackdown on illegal immigration — no matter its origin — Mexican officials have identified the movement of people as an issue on which to counter the US’s hardline toward Mexico, specifically on trade.

Since 2014, the Mexican government — at the urging of and with the assistance of the US government — has stepped up its apprehension and deportation of migrants from Central America.

By mid-2015, Mexico was deporting more of those migrants than the US. The 153,295 people from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras that Mexico stopped at its southern border in fiscal year 2016 were the second-most apprehended over the previous nine years.

Mexico drug tunnel entrance

“We have been a great ally to fight problems with migration, narcotics,” Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo told The Globe and Mail in an interview earlier this month.

“If at some point in time things become so badly managed in the relationship, the incentives for the Mexican people to keep on cooperating in things that are at the heart of [U.S.] national-security issues will be diminished.”

“You cannot ask me to [accept poor] conditions in terms of trade and then request my help to manage migration issues from other nations or … the prosecution of criminal activities and narcotics,” Guajardo said.

“Mexico should stop doing the United States’ dirty work on our southern border and stopping Central American minors or refugees or people fleeing the violence in Central America from going to the United States,” Casteñada, the former foreign minister, told CNN this week.

“If they want to go to the United States, let them go,” he said. “We should just let them through.”

Though his time in office has been short, Trump’s posture toward Mexico has inflamed much of the country.

Mexico government protest Donald Trump Pena Nieto

In a poll of Mexicans conducted in late January by Mexican newspaper El Economista, 81.2% of respondents said they had a “bad” opinion of Trump — just one in 25 Mexicans said they had a “good” opinion of the US president.

The personal, business, and political ties between the two countries are many, and some people in Mexico are quite worried about the strain on the relationship, but Mexicans — among whom a sense of nationalism endures — may not accept the status quo indefinitely.

“I think that Mexico has been a good-faith partner to the United States up until the present, and Mexico needs the United States, and the United States needs Mexico,” Shirk, who directs the Justice in Mexico program at USD, told Business Insider.

“But Mexico is a proud country, and at a certain point we will lose their good faith,” Shirk said. “Mexico has to, at some point, I think, look out for itself.”

SEE ALSO: A ‘complex moment’ — Mexico is looking to strike back against the US’s wallet

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: The Trump family’s lavish lifestyle is costing taxpayers a fortune

Source link

'Doubt' Pulled By CBS After 2 Airings, 'Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders' To Replace It – Deadline

Doubt (CBS)

We have the swiftest cancellation of the season. CBS has pulled midseason legal drama Doubt from the schedule effective immediately after two low-rated airings. Next week, a repeat of Bull will air in Doubt‘s Wednesday 10 PM slot. The following Wednesday, March 8, Criminal Minds: Beyond Border will take over the hour where the spinoff originally launched last spring. The drama’s Season 2 opener will follow the two-hour 34th season premiere of Survivor. Starting March 15, Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders will air behind mothership Criminal Minds as it did last season.

Per tradition, CBS is not calling this a cancellation. Doubt may return to the schedule at some point, possibly as a summer burnoff.

Image (1) cbs-logo__130807030134.jpg for post 575646

Doubt had a long road to the screen.It was originally developed and piloted last season and then partially recast off-cycle, with Katherine Heigl as new lead. The legal drama made TV history as the first broadcast series with a regular transgender character played by a transgender actor, Laverne Cox.

Doubt got off to a disappointing ratings start, opening to a 0.8 Live+same day rating among adults 18-49 and 5.29 million viewers. That was the lowest CBS Live+SD in-season drama series debut in the demo and the lowest rated show on any of the Big 4 last night.

Doubt dropped -25%  in the second week to a 0.6 in the demo and 4 million viewers (L+SD) in what was the series’ final airing (at least for now).

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Facing 40 criminal charges, Anne Williams fires lawyer | News … – The Daily Progress

#ndn-video-player-1.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px; #ndn-video-player-2.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px;

ORANGE—The embezzlement case against Anne Williams stalled Friday in circuit court after she abruptly fired her primary attorney and an associate lawyer quit the case that alleges the misuse of large sums of money intended for the care of animals through the defendant’s now nonexistent horse rescue.

Orange County Circuit Court Judge Daniel Bouton issued a stern warning to 58-year-old Williams though saying he was not accusing her of doing anything wrong.

“I don’t want you to think you can just go through attorney after attorney after attorney to try and delay, delay and delay the proceedings,” the judge said of the three lawyers she went through in the last 16 months. “There will come a time when we have to balance your rights with the need to move this case forward.”

Associate attorney Michael Hu Young of Richmond appeared in court Friday ready to argue several defense motions he had drafted for Williams, but instead ended up filing a motion to withdraw as her counsel, which Bouton granted. Young said he rarely quits a case.

“I’m old school—I stay on a case until the final decision,” Young said.

In this case, he said his firm asked him to stop representing Williams because of its financial focus and the fact that he has not served as her primary counsel like Alexandria attorney John Zwerling had.

“The problem that led to me firing Mr. Zwerling only occurred last night,” Williams said Friday morning, pressed by the judge about why she didn’t have an attorney.

Orange attorney Thomas Purcell acted as her original lawyer when she was arrested Oct. 26, 2015, in the separate but related case charging Williams with 27 misdemeanor counts of animal cruelty. In the fall of that year, the Orange County Sheriff’s Office reported finding more than 100 horses, cats, dogs and other animals starving, dying, sick or dead at Williams’ former animal rescue, Peaceable Farms, in Somerset.

Purcell no longer represents Williams either; she is set to face the animal cruelty charges at trial March 31 in Orange County General District Court.

Williams was rearrested March 28, 2016, on 13 felony counts of embezzlement carrying a maximum sentence of 260 years in the state penitentiary, according to court records. She remains free on $100,000 bond.

Bouton advised her Friday to get a new attorney very quickly, and to establish a good working relationship with that person.

“You are here in circuit court on some very serious charges without an attorney,” the judge said, adding, “You certainly have the means to afford counsel.”

Bouton ordered her to be back in circuit court April 3 with her new attorney or a letter from the attorney indicating representation, and she agreed that she would.

Peaceable Farms finances

According to court records, Peaceable Farms started as a federally-recognized nonprofit in 2011 in Barnesville, Maryland “to be operated exclusively for the prevention of cruelty to animals” and as a horse rescue and sanctuary program. Williams, then Anne Goland, was elected president of the board and her then-husband, Anthony Goland, was named secretary and treasurer of Peaceable Farms.

In 2011, contributions to the animal rescue totaled $696,582, according to court records.

In 2012, $1.055 million was donated to Peaceable Farms—including nearly $668,000 given by Anne and Anthony Goland along with various other donors giving as much as $100,000 and lesser amounts in the thousands of dollars, according to court records. Also that year, the horse rescue moved to Orange County, occupying a scenic piece of countryside in Somerset, just off Route 231 neighboring the farm with Virginia’s largest corn maze.

Donations to Peaceable Farms reached $1.1 million in 2013, a total that included another $772,000 from the Golands, according to court records, and various other donors making up the difference. By 2014, the organization’s total income was $3.7 million, tax records showed.

Court documents from the first three years of Peaceable Farms included detailed logs showing multiple large purchases of hay, feed, veterinary services and various other services associated with running an animal rescue and farm. In at least one tax year, the nonprofit showed balanced expenses and income.

In 2015, Anthony and Anne Goland ended their marriage, the divorce decree made final on July 29 – just a few months before Orange County sheriff’s deputies discovered the reportedly deplorable state of Peaceable Farms in what the sheriff described at the time as a case of animal hoarding.

The alleged embezzlement of Peaceable Farms funds occurred between 2012 and 2015—during the defendant’s marriage to Anthony Goland—when she reportedly wrote checks for her own use on at least 13 separate occasions, court records said. At that time, Williams had access to more than $5 million, including more than $3 million in donations, according to court records.

Defense motions not argued yet

Following her arrest in 2015, Williams, banned from returning to her Somerset farm and ordered to surrender her passport, went to live with an aunt in Culpeper. She’s since lived in Charlottesville and rented a room in a Warrenton motel. According to court records, Williams now lives in Glen Allen.

One of the several defense motions Young had planned to argue Friday involved the motel room and a “confidential” police tip that Williams had allegedly “secreted” one or more cats in it after being court ordered not to acquire anymore animals, according to court records.

Acting on the tip, Orange County Sheriff’s Capt. W.O. Hayes went to the motel room in Warrenton on March 31, 2016, three days after Williams was arrested and still in jail.

Motel management informed Hayes that Williams’ reservation had expired and they were about to remove all of her items for placement in storage. The sheriff’s captain then entered the motel room and viewed three banker’s boxes of documents and tax records, according to court records. Later that night, attorney Purcell showed up and paid the motel bill.

The next day, Hayes returned with a search warrant. Court records did not mention the presence of any cats.

Young’s motion was to suppress any evidence seized from the motel room, claiming that Hayes made illegal entry. The commonwealth, in a motion to deny the defense motion, argued Williams waived her right to warrantless search and seizure as one of her bail conditions.

Young’s motion said she only waived her rights to ensure compliance with those conditions “and not to allow law enforcement officers unfettered access to her motel room or personal belongings to investigate and look for evidence of additional crimes or to trample her 4th amendment rights as they pleased.”

Another defense motion Young did not argue Friday was to exclude from evidence at trial any communications Williams had with her husband during their marriage. The commonwealth argued those communications occurred during the alleged embezzlement and therefore are not confidential.

Finally, Young did not argue a third motion seeking to exclude any evidence of animal abuse because it would be “uniquely inflammatory” and is irrelevant to the embezzlement case, according to court records.

The commonwealth, in a motion to deny, said the animal cruelty charges “tend to prove the essential element of wrongful appropriations of funds. Instead of using these funds to care for the animals, the defendant wrongfully used the funds for her own purposes.”

#ndn-video-player-3.ndn_embedded .ndn_floatContainer margin-top: 10px; margin-bottom: 20px;

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Source link

Trump's immigration crackdown is paving the way for a 'deportation force'

john kelly homeland security

Two memos released by the Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday helped spell out President Donald Trump’s plans for aggressively enforcing federal immigration laws, and they were quickly criticized by immigration advocates as providing a blueprint for mass deportations.

The memos include sweeping guidelines that supersede previous Obama administration directives and that increase the power federal authorities have in detaining and deporting immigrants living in the US illegally.

But while the memos don’t detail the financial resources that will be needed to implement Trump’s orders, they do mention the hiring of 10,000 Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers and 5,000 Customs and Border Protection agents.

Immigration advocates say those hirings, coupled with the expansion of the 287(g) program, which allows local police officers to act as federal immigration officers, would create a “deportation force” and threaten the removal of nearly every all of the estimated 11 million immigrants living in the country without permission.

Yet past examples of such measures have been far from successful — from a botched CBP hiring spree beginning in 2006 to ongoing accusations that police departments have discriminated against Latinos. Immigration experts are cautioning that the Trump administration’s actions could do more harm than good.

“I think that in the end, this could have a really devastating consequence for immigrant communities and undermine public safety, rather than making the nation more secure,” Joshua Breisblatt, an immigration policy analyst at the American Immigration Council, a nonprofit advocacy group, told Business Insider.

Local police enforcing federal immigration laws

ICE immigration sweepOne of the most controversial aspects to the DHS memos has been the expansion of the 287(g) program, which calls for more local law-enforcement agencies to voluntarily participate in federal immigration enforcement.

This program was implemented two decades ago but was largely scaled back by the Obama administration, which allowed many of its agreements with police departments to lapse without renewal. Today, just 38 law-enforcement agencies across 16 states still participate in 287(g).

The program led to 175,000 deportations from 2006 to 2013, according to federal statistics, and in some cases resulted in widespread racial profiling — the most infamous case being that of Sheriff Joe Arpaio in Arizona’s Maricopa County, where a federal judge ruled in 2013 that Arpaio’s leadership resulted in the discrimination against Latinos.

Critics fear that an expansion in the 287(g) program will lead to a replication of what happened in Maricopa County under Arpaio’s tenure.

“We are going to see an incentive for localities to engage in racial profiling and other abusive practices that violate basic protection,” Greg Chen, the advocacy director for the American Immigration Lawyers Association, told the Houston Chronicle.

“They’re going to start picking up anyone who may appear to be in violation of immigration law.”

Yet it is up to police departments to determine whether they want to participate in the program, and already some are offering resistance. On Tuesday, Sheriff Ed Gonzalez of Harris County, Texas, announced he would end his department’s participation in 287(g).

The program cost taxpayers $675,000 annually for the salaries of 10 deputies, Gonzalez said, who worked to determine jailed suspects’ immigration statuses and hold them for deportation.

Gonzalez said the decision to end the program was a matter of resource allocation and the deputies were needed elsewhere in the department.

“After thoughtful consideration, I’ve decided to opt out of the voluntary 287(g) program,” Gonzalez said in a letter notifying ICE officials. “We’ll still be cooperating with local state and federal authorities as we always have, we just won’t have our manpower resources inside the jail doing that.”

ice immigration raid

Hiring a ‘deportation force’

As for adding 10,000 ICE officers and 5,000 CBP officers, Breisblatt of the American Immigration Council said that was easier said than done and large-scale hiring efforts for these agencies had previously gone awry.

Some immigration agencies have struggled in recent years with staffing levels. CBP’s Border Patrol, for instance, is supposed to have a minimum of 21,370 agents but maintains only about 20,000 because of retention problems and long hiring processes, Breisblatt said.

“They can’t even meet the standard Congress is setting for them, so the idea that they’re going to be able to quickly hire another 5,000 — I’m not sure how that’s actually going to work in practice,” he said.

ICE employs 7,000 full-time officers for its Enforcement and Removal Operation. To add more than double that number of officers to the agency is tantamount to “the creation of a deportation force,” Breisblatt said.

The Trump administration has denied that its goal is to carry out mass deportations, but it has also broadened the official language identifying deportation priorities to include virtually all immigrants living in the country illegally.

A federal immigration agency most recently implemented a large-scale hiring spree back in 2006, when CBP launched efforts to hire more than 20,000 agents. The next five years, however, saw a 44% increase in employee arrests on suspicion of misconduct and more than 100 corruption charges and arrests, with many accused of taking bribes or smuggling drugs or people, according to the Associated Press.

This led to the introduction of lie detectors during the hiring of officers, the results of which were “shocking,” according to James Tomsheck, the former head of internal affairs for CBP.

After the tests were introduced in 2008, Tomsheck said, more than half of applicants failed, and many acknowledged having been convicted of felonies or being involved in smuggling activities. Several were even confirmed infiltrators hired by drug-trafficking groups to “essentially be spies in our midst,” Tomsheck told NPR.

Tomsheck said the litany of problems that emerged from the 2006 hiring spree should serve as a grave warning to the Trump administration before attempting to boost the number of ICE and CBP officials.

“If we hire people that are grossly unsuitable for the position and place them in critical, sensitive positions along the southwestern border, not only would it not enhance security, it would likely compromise security,” he said.

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly himself relayed concerns earlier this month regarding a hiring spree, suggesting it was unrealistic to hire thousands of people within the next few years.

“I’d rather have fewer and make sure that they’re high-quality people,” Kelly told lawmakers. “I will not skimp on the training and the standards.”

SEE ALSO: DHS memos detail aggressive immigration enforcement and speedier deportations

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Merriam-Webster can’t stop trolling the Trump administration on Twitter

Source link