Crimes and Their Punishments – Through the Ages

Punishments for Crimes through the ages – from the bizarre to outrageous, from the sublime to the ridiculous. We don’t know how lucky we are!

Many of us are apt to complain about sentences handed out by our Courts for crimes these days – too harsh, too lenient. But a quick look at some punishments for crimes through the ages, including in some countries today, we should really consider how much we really have to complain about.

Not only have punishments been truly shocking (and in some instances still are), but even some of the crimes are truly unbelievable.

Many Sydney criminal lawyers would have had their work cut out for them if some of these historical crimes were still on the statute books! Lucky for us that our complaints about the justice systems these days are limited to whether an offender should be given a jail sentence or community service, or whether a 2 year sentence is sufficient or whether 5 would have been better, and so on.

Thank goodness we don’t have to contend with crimes for which the penalty is being tortured to death by some truly unimaginable means. Criminal lawyers in Australia, as in Europe, the United States, Canada, New Zealand and others, these days don’t have to plead for the type of mercy that offenders of times gone by had to. And of course, some of these barbaric practices do still exist today in other parts of the globe, as you can see below.

Some Crimes and Some Punishments You Won’t Believe

Take a look …

Crimes and Their Punishments

Mexico took down another high-profile cartel leader, and the backlash may already have started

Mexican marines soldiers matamoros tamaulipas

  • A top Gulf cartel leader was captured at a home near the US-Mexico border early on Monday morning.
  • Less than a day later, residents in the area reported gunfire and other violent scenes.
  • The complex criminal environment in Mexico makes it hard to tell where things are going, but such disruptions in leadership have sparked violence in the past.

Mexican marines captured a top leader in the Gulf cartel in northeast Mexico on Monday, just a few weeks after a high-level member of the rival Zetas cartel was captured in Mexico City.

Jose Alfredo Cardenas, nicknamed “the Nephew” and “the Accountant,” was arrested in Matamoros early on Monday. Officials said no shots were fired in the raid that also seized two military-grade weapons, ammunition, and some cocaine and marijuana. A group of armed men reportedly fled the scene.

Mexican authorities tracked down Cardenas using wire intercepts, Mike Vigil, former chief of international operations for the US Drug Enforcement Administration, told Business Insider. Cardenas was captured along with two other men while entering a house, added Vigil, who said additional weapons and documents were also seized.

37-year-old Cardenas is the nephew of Osiel Cardenas Guillen, the Gulf cartel boss who was arrested in 2003, extradited to the US in 2007, and sentenced to 25 years in prison in 2010. The younger Cardenas became a cartel leader after Guillen’s capture, and, according to the DEA’s 2017 National Drug Threat Assessment, he is one of two main leaders in a cartel that has seen “rapid turnover in leadership.”

Mexican federal officials said that Cardenas — one of the country’s most wanted criminals — moved between Matamoros, the nearby city of Brownsville in Texas, and Mexico state in central Mexico.

Osiel Cardenas Guillen arrest Mexico Houston federal court

The Gulf cartel has fragmented, with several factions now vying for influence in Tamaulipas, the cartel’s traditional stronghold. The state is an important smuggling route for narcotics, migrants, and other illicit goods, and criminal groups there have expanded into kidnapping, extortion, resource theft, and other activities. Homicides in the state have risen each of the past three years, hitting 1,053 in 2017.

“What has happened in Tamaulipas is we have had two big groups of organized crime that have fragmented, and now we have more than 20,” Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, a professor at George Mason University, told Business Insider at the end of January.

“It’s difficult to identify the number of cells that survive right now in the state and are still occupying or controlling different criminal activities,” Correa-Cabrera, author of “Los Zetas Inc,” said at the time. There are “different factions of the Gulf cartel and some factions of the Zetas” in other cities around the state.

gulf cartel arrest

Cardenas reportedly took control of a Gulf cartel faction in the area after the April 2017 killing of  Juan Manuel Loisa Salinas, known as “Comandante Toro,” in Reynosa, a border city west of Matamoros. Mexican government sources also identified him as the Gulf cartel boss in Matamoros.

A statement issued by the Mexican navy after Cardenas’ arrested said, “presumably he was the leader of a criminal organization in the region.”

He was reportedly competing for control of the cartel with a rival group in the nearby Mexican city of Rio Bravo.

By early Tuesday morning — less than 24 hours after Cardenas’ capture — Matamoros residents were using social media to report gun battles in several areas of the city. “Matamoros under shootouts” and “precaution” were messages circulating with video recordings of the gunfire that appeared on social media.

Some cars were reportedly left stranded after their tires punctured by spikes left on roads.

Correa-Cabrera said that while it was too early to say definitively what provoked the clashes, they did appear related to Cardenas’ arrest.

Reynosa Matamoros Tamaulipas Mexico homicides

After the mayorship was transferred from the conservative National Action Party and the center-right Institutional Revolutionary Party in late 2016, the situation in Matamoros appeared more coherent, and the Gulf cartel leader’s capture may have disrupted some kind of pact that had been agreed upon, Correa-Cabrera told Business Insider on Tuesday.

“I am not sure why they arrested Cardenas,” she added. “It is interesting. We need to wait and see.”

Violence also broke out in Reynosa in the hours after the killing of Comandante Toro in April last year. Armed gunmen shut down parts of the city with road blockades, and the federal attorney general’s office there came under fire several times. The months afterward also saw sustained, elevated violence.

However, Correa-Cabrera stressed that the criminal dynamics in Reynosa and Tamaulipas are distinct, making it hard to predict what the fallout will be.

“We are not dealing here with a pure ‘kingpin strategy effect,’ understood in the most traditional sense” as a fight between malefactors for control of the territory, Correa-Cabrera told Business Insider.

Rather, a variety of actors with overlapping and sometimes shared interests are in Reynosa, she said, including federal forces, state authorities, and factions of different criminal groups. Paramilitary groups, made up of criminal and government forces acting in concert, may also be present. (There are at least 18 regional cartel leaders operating in northeast Mexico, according to El Universal.)

Criminal elements and members of the local, municipal, and state governments in Tamaulipas have often developed symbiotic relationships. Changes in political power and shifts in cartel leadership have in some instances disrupted those ties, leading to more violence.

“The situation in Reynosa is much more complex,” Correa-Cabrera said. “The whole state is very complex.”

SEE ALSO: Brazil is taking an ‘extreme measure’ to confront crime in Rio — the first time it’s done so since the country’s dictatorship fell

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Ask Ausiello: Spoilers on Walking Dead, iZombie, Roseanne, Criminal Minds, Chicago Fire — Plus, New Blind Item(s) – TVLine

Got a scoop request? An anonymous tip you’re dying to share? Send any/all of the above to askausiello@tvline.com

Question: Have you heard anything yet about how Abby is leaving NCIS? —Jane
Ausiello: Only that leading up to the end of her 15-season run, Pauley Perrette has aimed to scatter Easter eggs for longtime fans to find. “Her approach to [leaving] is to have fun with this,” Rocky Carroll told Matt Mitovich. “What she has been doing for her fans is make sprinkle in callbacks, certain Abby-isms, these little treats that the diehard NCIS fans will recognize. It’s her ‘farewell’ card to the audience, where people will see it and go, ‘Oh my god, that’s from Season 2, when this happened with Tony’ or ‘when this happened with Kate.’ She’s trying to take you on this treasure hunt, where every time you’re watching one of her scenes there’s a throwback to a previous season.”

Question: Got anything to look forward to on The Walking Dead? — Hal
Ausiello:
Yep — but maybe not imminently. When we spoke recently with showrunner Scott Gimple, we asked if, before Season 8 was through, we’d get any hints of the Whisperers, the next Big Bads after the Saviors in Robert Kirkman’s comic-book series. “I couldn’t say that,” he replied. However, the villains, who wear walker skins to blend in with the zombies, are “absolutely on the menu. I just wouldn’t necessarily say for this season or even exactly when.”

Question: I’m very excited to watch the revial of Roseanne. One thing I was curious about was the fact that there is no mention of Roseanne’s youngest son Jerry or Jackie’s son Andy. Are they not a part of this revival? —Kristen
Ausiello: They are not part of the nine-episode continuation, but we’ll learn in passing that Jerry “is on a fishing boat in Alaska,” Roseanne Bar recently revealed. Andy, meanwhile, “hasn’t been dealt with,” Barr noted, adding the decision was made to focus on the core characters this time around. “We had so many stories to tell over the arc of these nine episodes,” she explained. “[If we get] another season [we hope to bring] more clarity to those characters.”

Question: Any Criminal Minds scoop? —Diana
Ausiello:
MEATY EPISODE ALERT! The CBS drama is giving Kirsten Vangsness a meaty episode (hence the aforementioned MEATY EPISODE ALERT!) later this spring when a parole hearing is held for the drunk driver that killed Penelope’s parents. Her estranged stepbrother resurfaces and promptly urges his sis to testify. Sounds meaty, right?

Question: Any news on Timeless? —Eric
Ausiello: On this, the anniversary of Timeless‘ freshman finale, I can tell you that the Season 2 premiere (that almost wasn’t) is highly accessible for potential new viewers/Clockblockers, opening as it does with a substantial (and highly entertaining) “Previously On…” montage. The NBC crowdpleaser then blows up its premise a bit to set the stage for new drama, in the wake of Lucy learning her mother is Rittenhouse. Along the way, Lucy will bump up against a real-life mother/daughter that is dealing with its own complicated issues, while back home we discover that one of the good guys has suffered a debilitating new setback. BONUS SCOOP: A Season 2 episode will find Lucy, Wyatt and Rufus doing the time warp back to March 30, 1981, aka the day President Reagan was shot.

Question: I’m very much praying Kevin (Probably) Saves the World returns for a second season. In the meantime, got anything on the March 6 finale? —Christopher
Ausiello: “There’s some big cliffhangers and some big changes,” the ABC drama’s titular star Jason Ritter tells us. “These final three [episodes] really ramp up the stakes. You’ll see how basically the second season – knock on wood – will be a completely new bag of tricks.” Meanwhile, here’s an update on the rookie drama’s renewal chances, c/o Ritter himself.

Question: Any scoop on Chicago Fire? —Karina
Ausiello: It would appear Severide has some unfinished business in his late ex’s hometown. “There will be a trip to Springfield at some point this season,” showrunner Derek Haas teases, before reminding fans that, yes, “Anna was from Springfield.” BONUS SCOOP: Speaking of Severide’s past flames (get it?!), rumor has it that troublemaker Hope will rear her head again — although not literally. Hmm….

Question: Will Danny get another love interest now that Linda is gone on Blue Bloods? I think a good pick would be his ex-partner, Jackie! They were always close! —Keith
Ausiello:
 First off, why are you screaming. Secondly, I have zero intel on a new romance for Danny, but I can confirm that the cop will be forced to team up with his incarcerated mob adversary Victor Lugo (once again played by Nick Cordero) for a very important case later this season.

QuestionL Desperate for scoop on iZombie! Anything on the new season from the show’s brains? —Steven
Ausiello:
As someone who’s been in a human-zombie relationship, Liv will have some words of advice for Clive and his undead girlfriend Dale in Season 4 (premiering Feb. 26). “She can see that it’s compromising for him,” star Rose McIver shares. “It’s really hard [for her] to watch [him] go through [that], and she weighs in more than she should.” As for the finale’s big Ravi cliffhanger — is he a zombie or not? — McIver teases, “it really pans out in a way that I think will surprise and intrigue people.”

Question: I’d love any spoilers on The Gifted, please! —Ash
Ausiello:
Season 2 of the Fox series might shed light on what exactly happened during the infamous 7/15 incident that led to the enactment of strict anti-mutant laws and all that came with that divisive move. “I would definitely like to explore 7/15 in more detail” and possibly via flashbacks, showrunner Matt Nix told TVLine. “What exactly happened there is certainly one of the central questions of the series,” and thus wouldn’t be recounted within just a singular episode. “It’s a bigger deal than that,” Nix notes, “linked as it is to the disappearance of the X-Men and the Brotherhood, the creation of the Mutant Underground and the attempted rebuilding of the Hellfire Club…. It’s kind of at the center of everything we’re doing.”

Question: I’m worried about this Juliette cult storyline on Nashville. Is Hayden Panettiere taking a break from the show? —Mandy
Ausiello:
I have it on good authority that Panettiere’s Juliette will be around for the rest of the drama’s final season. In fact, Episode 11 is pretty much all Juliette, all the time.

Question: Life in Pieces is having an amazing season. Do you have any scoop on what’s yet to come? —Karen
Ausiello:
An upcoming episode of the third-year CBS sitcom (returning Thursday, March 1) will feature singing, dancing and… puppets. (When Heather and Tim try to convince their youngest daughter Sophia to get rid of her stuffed animals, she rebuffs and in doing so imagines them singing and dancing along with her.)

This AAnd That…
Younger will venture into the belly of the New York Comic-Con beast in a Season 5 episode. I’m guessing this is somehow connected to Game of Thrones, er, I mean A Clash of Kings.
BLIND ITEM: An extremely popular broadcast drama that’s been on the air for less than three seasons is eyeing a season-ending plot that would find a pivotal character being diagnosed with terminal cancer.
♦ BLIND ITEM: PART DEUX: A male series regular on an hour-long streaming series that’s about to kick off its second season has made himself available for pilot season, which suggests his character is not long for the world.
♦ My birthday is Friday and in lieu of gifts please get #SantaBarbaraRevival trending on Twitter.

That’s a wrap! Please send questions, comments and anonymous tips to askausiello@tvline.com. (Additional reporting by Kim Roots, Vlada Gelman and Andy Swift)

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Former Skadden Lawyer Pleads Guilty to Lying in Russia Investigation – New York Times

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WASHINGTON — The son-in-law of a Russia-based billionaire admitted on Tuesday to lying to investigators about his communications with a former Trump campaign aide. The guilty plea by the defendant, a former lawyer at a powerful New York-based law firm, broadened the scope of the special counsel’s inquiry into Russia’s election interference.

The lawyer, Alex van der Zwaan, a 33-year-old Dutch citizen, acknowledged in federal court in Washington that he lied to prosecutors about a September 2016 conversation with Rick Gates, the former Trump aide, over work they did together for a Ukrainian political party aligned with Russia. He also admitted that he deleted records of email exchanges that prosecutors had sought. He faces up to five years in prison but said in court that he expected to serve six months or less.

Mr. van der Zwaan’s decision to plead guilty to a felony charge could intensify pressure on both Mr. Gates and on Paul Manafort, Mr. Gates’s longtime business partner and the president’s former campaign chairman. Both were charged in the fall with laundering money and other crimes related to consulting work they did for the Ukrainian political party headed by former President Viktor F. Yanukovych. They have pleaded not guilty.

It also focused attention on Mr. van der Zwaan’s former law firm, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, where he worked on a Ukrainian project steered by Mr. Gates and Mr. Manafort. In a statement, Skadden, a powerful international corporate law firm, said it fired Mr. van der Zwaan last year and was cooperating with the investigation.

Mr. van der Zwaan’s plea also illustrates how aggressively the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, has pursued those who obstruct his inquiry. Two former Trump aides, Michael T. Flynn and George Papadopoulos, have pleaded guilty to felony charges of misleading federal investigators.

They have yet to be sentenced and have committed to cooperating with the special counsel. It was unclear on Tuesday to what extent Mr. van der Zwaan is cooperating, but his plea agreement does not compel him to do so.

Mr. van der Zwaan’s gilt-edged life was based in London, where he worked for Skadden and lived with his wife after they were married last summer in a lavish English countryside wedding featured in the Russian edition of Tatler magazine. A 2006 law school graduate of King’s College London, he speaks four languages: Russian, Dutch, English and French.

His father-in-law, German Khan, who was born in Ukraine, is an owner of Alfa Group, Russia’s largest financial and industrial investment group. He was on a recent Treasury Department roster of prominent Russian officials and oligarchs.

Tuesday’s court hearing left many questions unanswered about Mr. van der Zwaan, including why he failed to be forthcoming to federal investigators about his communications with Mr. Gates and a second person who was identified by prosecutors only as “a longtime business associate of Manafort and Gates in Ukraine.”

Mr. van der Zwaan’s lies involved a 2012 report prepared by Skadden and used to defend Mr. Yanukovych, then the Russia-aligned president of Ukraine, from international criticism over the prosecution and incarceration of one of his political rivals, former Prime Minister Yulia V. Tymoshenko. State Department officials criticized the report, which purported to be the result of the law firm’s independent research, as a misleading account of the actions of Mr. Yanukovych’s government.

Mr. Mueller’s team scrutinized the report as part of its examination of the business dealings of Mr. Manafort and Mr. Gates in Ukraine, where Mr. Manafort worked for about a decade as a political consultant before he joined the Trump campaign. Among other charges, both men have been accused of “using one of their offshore accounts to funnel $4 million to pay secretly” for the report. It is unclear how much, if any, of that money went to Skadden or other firms with which they worked.

The Ukrainian authorities had begun their own investigation into payments for the report after Mr. Yanukovych fled Ukraine for Russia amid a popular uprising in 2014.

Mr. van der Zwaan told the special counsel on Nov. 3 that he had not spoken to Mr. Gates since mid-August 2016, even though Mr. Gates had called him the following month instructing him to get in contact with an unidentified mutual acquaintance, court papers show.

He also told prosecutors that he had not talked to that same acquaintance since 2014, even though he called that person in September 2016 to discuss possible criminal charges against Mr. Manafort, a law firm and a former Ukrainian justice minister. The phone conversation, conducted in Russian, was important enough that Mr. van der Zwaan recorded it, according to court papers. Mr. van der Zwaan followed up by calling Mr. Gates, recording that conversation as well.

One of those conversations involved payments that were described as “the tip of the iceberg,” Andrew Weissmann, a prosecutor in Mr. Mueller’s office, said in court. He did not elaborate.

Mr. van der Zwaan also acknowledged that he lied when he told investigators that he had only a “passive role in the rollout of the report,” according to court papers. In fact, prosecutors said, he had discussed with Mr. Gates and others how to publicize the report to make it appear less damning to Mr. Yanukovych’s government, including describing any mishandling of Ms. Tymoshenko’s prosecution as no more than “procedural” errors. Part of the strategy, Mr. Weissmann said in court, was to give an advance copy of the report to The New York Times.

The law firm’s work was being investigated by Ukraine’s top prosecutor, which asked the Department of Justice for help in questioning eight lawyers named as authors of the report, including Mr. van der Zwaan, according to documents reviewed by The Times.

Among the others were Gregory B. Craig, who served as President Barack Obama’s White House counsel, and Clifford M. Sloan, who also worked in the Obama administration. Both Mr. Craig and Mr. Sloan declined to comment.

The Ukrainian officials claimed that Mr. Yanukovych’s government circumvented contracting rules by initially agreeing to pay Skadden a fee that was less than the threshold for competitive bidding — reportedly about $12,000 — then later paying the firm a total of nearly $1.1 million.

Last year, the law firm refunded $567,000 to the Ukrainian government. The firm said the refund represented “the balance of Ukraine’s payment, which had been held in escrow for future work.”

A sentencing hearing for Mr. van der Zwaan was set for April 3.

The charges against him were the seventh criminal case that Mr. Mueller’s team has brought since October. Last week, the special counsel’s office indicted 13 Russians and three companies on charges of interfering in the 2016 United States election with a sophisticated influence campaign on popular social media platforms. An American, Richard Pinedo, of Santa Paula, Calif., also pleaded guilty to identity fraud regarding some bank accounts used by the Russians in their influence campaign.

Charlie Savage and Eileen Sullivan contributed reporting. Kitty Bennett contributed research.

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Guilty Plea by Lawyer Broadens Mueller Inquiry. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

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The US's top military-intelligence official described how the war on Mexico's cartels has produced even more violence

The US’s top military-intelligence official described how the war on Mexico’s cartels has produced even more violence

SEE ALSO: Mexico took down a US citizen who rose to the upper ranks of the vicious Zetas cartel

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'Criminal Minds' season 13 return release date, plot news: Linda Barnes threatens the dynamics within BAU – ChristianToday

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ChristianToday

'Criminal Minds' season 13 return release date, plot news: Linda Barnes threatens the dynamics within BAU
ChristianToday
The members of the Behavioral Analysis Unit (BAU) on "Criminal Minds" seems to be caught in a precarious crossroad as Linda Barnes (Kim Rhodes) is determined to crack down — and pin down — one of their own, their embattled acting unit chief, Emily

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Blac Chyna sex tape a 'criminal matter' according to her lawyer – Fox News

After a sex tape involving Blac Chyna leaked on the internet Monday, the reality star plans to go to the cops.

Chyna’s attorney Walter Mosley told TMZ the tape’s release is a “criminal matter” and that they’ll be contacting police to investigate. The identity of the male in the video is unknown.

Mosley also made a statement on Instagram.

“Why do we think it’s acceptable to sell, or publish, or seek revenge, or blackmail women in this way and without their consent? It’s not. Men … we have to do better,” he captioned a photo of himself with Chyna. “I’m tired of telling my clients to not make videos because the men will put them out later. It’s like I’m telling them not to wear short skirts because you’re going to entice a man to rape you. #smh And like most rapes, these betrayals often come from those most close to us.”

The post continued, “We need to stop sharing these videos with each other in the club, at the barbershop or (and especially) online. It is a morally corrupt action, which is (at least in California) criminal. Maybe it is time to set an example. #blacchyna”

This isn’t the first time sexually explicit imagery of Chyna, 29, has been released. Chyna’s ex-fiancé Rob Kardashian posted revenge porn of her over the summer. As a result, she hired attorney Lisa Bloom to represent her while seeking a restraining order against Kardashian.

It’s unclear who’s behind this new leak, but Bloom told Page Six on Monday that this type of cyberbullying is still illegal.

“Revenge porn — posting explicit images without the consent of everyone in those images — is a crime, a civil wrong and a form of domestic abuse,” she said. “It’s also a cruel attempt to slut-shame women for being sexual.”

Bloom later tweeted, “Girls have killed themselves over revenge porn. It’s not a joke.”

This article originally appeared in Page Six.

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13 American presidents who escaped attempts on their lives

Gerald Ford assassination attempt

  • In American history, four out of 45 US presidents have been assassinated.
  • However, many more presidents have escaped attempts on their lives, including Andrew Jackson, Ronald Reagan, and George W. Bush.
  • Below, learn more about which presidents survived — and how.

Four out of 45 US presidents have been assassinated over the course of American history.

But many more chief executives escaped assassination attempts thanks to heroic bystanders, diligent guards, misfiring pistols, and crazy luck.

Even two presidents who were eventually assassinated escaped previous attempts on their lives.

On a hot August night in 1864, a sniper shot Lincoln’s hat off his head — missing his skull by inches — as he took a solo ride on his favorite horse “Old Abe,” according to “1864: Lincoln at the Gates of History.” Lincoln was later shot and killed by Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth, just five days after the surrender of Robert E. Lee.

Almost a century later, in 1960, retired postal worker Richard Paul Pavlick crammed his car with dynamite and plotted to ram the vehicle into Kennedy’s limo in Palm Beach, Florida, according to Smithsonian magazine. He was motivated by his intense hatred of Catholics and the Kennedy family, but backed off when he saw that the president was with his wife and young children. Pavlick was later arrested and institutionalized until 1966, three years after Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald while visiting Dallas, Texas.

But these 13 other presidents all experienced serious assassination threats and ultimately survived — and these are only the most dramatic, most-publicized instances. Undoubtedly, the Secret Service has thwarted many more over the years.

Here are 13 presidents who escaped attempts on their lives:

SEE ALSO: 14 US presidents who were members of one of the most powerful secret societies in history

Andrew Jackson

On a misty January day in 1835, Richard Lawrence, an out-of-work house painter who believed he was the 15th-century English king Richard III, walked into the US Capitol Building.

President Andrew Jackson was leaving the funeral of a House representative when the English national confronted him in the East Portico, brandishing a pistol.

He raised the gun at Andrew Jackson and pulled the trigger. Nothing happened.

“Let me alone! Let me alone!” Jackson yelled at Lawrence, according to Smithsonian magazine. “I know where this came from.”

Lawrence discarded the weapon, produced a second pistol, and aimed the new gun at Jackson. It also misfired.

According to legend, Jackson subsequently flew at the man and thrashed him with his cane. Whether or not that’s true, Lawrence’s assassination attempt was unsuccessful. Smithsonian magazine reported that national anthem lyricist Francis Scott Key prosecuted his trial, where he was found not guilty by reason of insanity. Lawrence spent the rest of his life institutionalized.

As Time reported, the chance that both perfectly functional pistols would misfire was about one in 125,000. Jackson’s survival may have depended on the dampness in the air that day.

Theodore Roosevelt

President Theodore Roosevelt was saved by the length of his speech after an assassin shot him in the chest with a .38-caliber revolver in 1912.

At the time, Roosevelt was running for the presidency on the Bull and Moose ticket. Saloon-owner John Schrank had begun stalking the former president after having an unusual dream.

According to “Killing the President: Assassinations, Attempts, and Rumored Attempts on U.S. Commanders-in-Chief,” Schrank wrote: “In a dream I saw President McKinley sit up in his coffin pointing at a man in a monk’s attire in whom I recognized Theodore Roosevelt. The dead President said, ‘This is my murderer — avenge my death.'”

Fortunately, Roosevelt had his notes with him when he was shot on October 14 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin — 50 pages of them, folded in his breast pocket next to his metal glasses case. These objects slowed the bullet and saved Roosevelt’s life.

The ex-president continued to speak after letting his audience know he’d been shot, according to the Theodore Roosevelt Association:

“Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose. But fortunately I had my manuscript, so you see I was going to make a long speech, and there is a bullet — there is where the bullet went through — and it probably saved me from it going into my heart. The bullet is in me now, so that I cannot make a very long speech, but I will try my best.”

He finished the rest of his speech with a bullet in his ribs, where it remained until his death in 1919.

Herbert Hoover

In 1928, President Herbert Hoover was nearly killed while visiting the Andes.

Argentine anarchists attempted to blow up his train, but the would-be assassin was seized before he could plant the bombs on the tracks.

After learning of the thwarted plot, Hoover tore the front page story from the newspaper so his wife Lou Henry Hoover wouldn’t worry, according to the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum. The 31st president is said to have quipped that while he was unconcerned, “It’s just as well that Lou shouldn’t see it.”

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Threatened and vilified, but Philippine lawyer says he wants 'death squad president' in court – Reuters

MANILA (Reuters) – Philippine attorney Jude Sabio says he hasn’t been home for a year, steers clear of public events and is forever looking over his shoulder after accusing President Rodrigo Duterte of crimes against humanity.

Sabio, a stocky 51 year-old, says he lives in constant fear of reprisals after filing a complaint at the International Criminal Court (ICC) against the wildly popular Duterte, whose administration Filipinos rate as the best performing since opinion polls started in the 1980s.

A little-known lawyer until he filed the complaint last April, Sabio argues that the deaths of thousands of Filipinos in a brutal war on drugs is Duterte’s method of controlling crime, and that he used the tactic effectively during his 22 years as the mayor of Davao City in the south of the country.

Duterte has repeatedly denied ordering extra-judicial killings while mayor or president and reiterated this month that he would “gladly” go before the ICC. Court Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda had earlier said her office had started a preliminary examination into whether any crimes against humanity had been committed and if ICC had jurisdiction.

The step is the first in a process that could take years to complete, if at all. Since it was set up in 2002, the ICC has received more than 12,000 complaints or communications, just nine of which have gone to trial.

Sabio’s move is unpopular in a country where, despite the bloodshed, Duterte enjoys a cult-like status and has a loyal online following which hounds and harasses his opponents.

The Social Weather Station’s (SWS) latest quarterly poll shows Duterte’s trust rating bounced back to “excellent” in December from “very high” three months before. Another SWS poll gave his government the best rating so far for a Philippine administration

“When I went to The Hague I received so many threats,” Sabio told Reuters. “The (latest) announcement from the ICC, I‘m also receiving threats. It’s many, I don’t want to read them.”

Presidential spokesman Harry Roque says “domestic enemies of the state” are behind Sabio’s complaint. Asked about Sabio’s safety, Roque said he should report threats to the police.

“We have no ill will against him,” he added. “We know it (the complaint) will not proceed beyond preliminary examination.”

“THE PUNISHER”

In an interview, Sabio described Duterte as a “death squad president” who bragged in public about killing criminals and promised voters he would kill thousands in an anti-drug crackdown if elected.

Duterte earned the nickname “the Punisher” because of allegations he operated a death squad that killed more than 1,000 criminals when he was Davao mayor. He suggested during a televised presidential election debate in 2016 that more would die if he became president.

“I do not want to commit a crime. But if by chance, God would place me there (as president), you watch out,” he said in widely reported comments. “This 1,000 will be 100,000. You will see the fish in Manila Bay become fat, I will throw you there.”

On the day of his inauguration in June 2016, he told supporters: “If you know any addicts, go ahead and kill them yourself as getting their parents to do it would be too painful.”

Since Duterte took office, 4,021 people have been killed in what police call legitimate operations against “drug personalities” they say ended in shootouts, according to police data. About 2,300 other drug-related homicides have been blamed by police on vigilantes.

Human rights groups say police take their cue from Duterte’s rhetoric and accuse them of executing suspects, mostly drug users and small-time pushers from slum districts. Police deny that and Duterte insists security forces can kill only in self-defence.

When he made the ICC complaint, Sabio said he was broke and needed sponsors to pay for his flight to The Hague. He had undergone an angioplasty and been through a marriage breakup, and was working out of an office his friend let him use for free.

He says he is still not fully recovered but he had no regrets.

“I always thought in the past the cases I fought, no matter how small, were preparing me for something big in the future,” said Sabio, who was a criminal lawyer in Manila for two decades before his marriage ended, prompting him to return south to his home city of Cagayan de Oro in 2015 to open his own practice.

“Fate directed me to the ICC.”

Sabio’s involvement started when a man named Edgar Matobato testified to a Senate inquiry in September 2016 that he was a hit man who killed at Duterte’s behest when he was Davao City mayor. Sabio said he learned from a priest that Matobato had no lawyer, so he volunteered.

The inquiry concluded there was no proof of a Davao death squad. It was reopened in February 2017 when a second self-confessed assassin testified, but senators again concluded there was insufficient evidence.

Sabio went to The Hague two months later to file a complaint he said is backed by many Filipinos, among them some of Duterte’s political opponents.

Two of those, lawmakers Gary Alejano and Antonio Trillanes, have filed a supplementary communication with the ICC to reinforce Sabio’s 77-page complaint. Both have welcomed the ICC’s preliminary examination.

Sabio said he knows what he’s doing will anger most Filipinos, but he’s undeterred.

“Popularity cannot be invoked as a defence in the ICC, it is irrelevant, it doesn’t matter,” he said.

“I don’t care if millions of Filipinos will look at me as a villain.”

(This version of the story corrects paragraph 19 to show Sabio was lawyer for 20 years in Manila, not Cagayan de Oro)

Editing by Raju Gopalakrishnan

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Jimmy Kimmel gives emotional plea to Trump on gun control after Parkland school shooting: 'You've literally done nothing'

jimmy kimmel

  • Jimmy Kimmel gave an emotional plea to President Trump on gun control Thursday, over the school shooting that killed 17 people in Parkland, Florida.
  • The host challenged Trump and Republican lawmakers for framing mass shootings as a “mental health” issue and taking money from the NRA.

 

Jimmy Kimmel addressed the deadly school shooting that killed 17 people in Parkland, Florida, in an emotional monologue on Thursday night’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”

Kimmel began the monologue by playing two clips of President Trump discussing the shooting, in which Trump said, “No parent should ever have to fear for their sons and daughters when they kiss them goodbye in the morning.”

Agreed,” Kimmel responded. “Here’s what you do to fix that. Tell your buddies in Congress — tell Paul Ryan and Mitch McConnell and Marco Rubio, all the family men who care so much about their communities — that what we need are laws. Real laws that do everything possible to keep assault rifles out of the hands of people who are going to shoot our kids.”

Authorities said Nikolas Cruz, 19, killed 17 people and injured 14 more at Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school with an AR-15 semiautomatic rifle on Wednesday.

Kimmel continued to address Trump in an emotional plea.

Tell these Congressmen and lobbyists, who infest that swamp you said you were going to drain, force these allegedly Christian men and women who stuff their pockets with money from the NRA year after year after year to do something,” he said.

“Children are being murdered! Do something,” Kimmel continued, his voice breaking. “We still haven’t even talked about it. You still haven’t done anything about this. Nothing. You’ve literally done nothing.”

Kimmel concluded the monologue by addressing how Trump and Republican lawmakers have framed mass shootings as a “mental health” issue. The host said that one of Trump’s first acts as president was to roll back a regulation designed to prevent the mentally ill from purchasing firearms.

Watch the monologue below:

SEE ALSO: Parkland, Florida, and the deadliest shootings in US history all have one thing in common

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Threatened and vilified, but Philippine lawyer says he wants 'death … – Reuters

MANILA (Reuters) – Philippine attorney Jude Sabio says he hasn’t been home for a year, steers clear of public events and is forever looking over his shoulder after accusing President Rodrigo Duterte of crimes against humanity.

Sabio, a stocky 51 year-old, says he lives in constant fear of reprisals after filing a complaint at the International Criminal Court (ICC) against the wildly popular Duterte, whose administration Filipinos rate as the best performing since opinion polls started in the 1980s.

A little-known lawyer until he filed the complaint last April, Sabio argues that the deaths of thousands of Filipinos in a brutal war on drugs is Duterte’s method of controlling crime, and that he used the tactic effectively during his 22 years as the mayor of Davao City in the south of the country.

Duterte has repeatedly denied ordering extra-judicial killings while mayor or president and reiterated this month that he would “gladly” go before the ICC. Court Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda had earlier said her office had started a preliminary examination into whether any crimes against humanity had been committed and if ICC had jurisdiction.

The step is the first in a process that could take years to complete, if at all. Since it was set up in 2002, the ICC has received more than 12,000 complaints or communications, just nine of which have gone to trial.

Sabio’s move is unpopular in a country where, despite the bloodshed, Duterte enjoys a cult-like status and has a loyal online following which hounds and harasses his opponents.

The Social Weather Station’s (SWS) latest quarterly poll shows Duterte’s trust rating bounced back to “excellent” in December from “very high” three months before. Another SWS poll gave his government the best rating so far for a Philippine administration

“When I went to The Hague I received so many threats,” Sabio told Reuters. “The (latest) announcement from the ICC, I‘m also receiving threats. It’s many, I don’t want to read them.”

Presidential spokesman Harry Roque says “domestic enemies of the state” are behind Sabio’s complaint. Asked about Sabio’s safety, Roque said he should report threats to the police.

“We have no ill will against him,” he added. “We know it (the complaint) will not proceed beyond preliminary examination.”

“THE PUNISHER”

In an interview, Sabio described Duterte as a “death squad president” who bragged in public about killing criminals and promised voters he would kill thousands in an anti-drug crackdown if elected.

Duterte earned the nickname “the Punisher” because of allegations he operated a death squad that killed more than 1,000 criminals when he was Davao mayor. He suggested during a televised presidential election debate in 2016 that more would die if he became president.

“I do not want to commit a crime. But if by chance, God would place me there (as president), you watch out,” he said in widely reported comments. “This 1,000 will be 100,000. You will see the fish in Manila Bay become fat, I will throw you there.”

On the day of his inauguration in June 2016, he told supporters: “If you know any addicts, go ahead and kill them yourself as getting their parents to do it would be too painful.”

Since Duterte took office, 4,021 people have been killed in what police call legitimate operations against “drug personalities” they say ended in shootouts, according to police data. About 2,300 other drug-related homicides have been blamed by police on vigilantes.

Human rights groups say police take their cue from Duterte’s rhetoric and accuse them of executing suspects, mostly drug users and small-time pushers from slum districts. Police deny that and Duterte insists security forces can kill only in self-defence.

When he made the ICC complaint, Sabio said he was broke and needed sponsors to pay for his flight to The Hague. He had undergone an angioplasty and been through a marriage breakup, and was working out of an office his friend let him use for free.

He says he is still not fully recovered but he had no regrets.

“I always thought in the past the cases I fought, no matter how small, were preparing me for something big in the future,” said Sabio, who was a criminal lawyer in Manila for two decades before his marriage ended, prompting him to return south to his home city of Cagayan de Oro in 2015 to open his own practice.

“Fate directed me to the ICC.”

Sabio’s involvement started when a man named Edgar Matobato testified to a Senate inquiry in September 2016 that he was a hit man who killed at Duterte’s behest when he was Davao City mayor. Sabio said he learned from a priest that Matobato had no lawyer, so he volunteered.

The inquiry concluded there was no proof of a Davao death squad. It was reopened in February 2017 when a second self-confessed assassin testified, but senators again concluded there was insufficient evidence.

Sabio went to The Hague two months later to file a complaint he said is backed by many Filipinos, among them some of Duterte’s political opponents.

Two of those, lawmakers Gary Alejano and Antonio Trillanes, have filed a supplementary communication with the ICC to reinforce Sabio’s 77-page complaint. Both have welcomed the ICC’s preliminary examination.

Sabio said he knows what he’s doing will anger most Filipinos, but he’s undeterred.

“Popularity cannot be invoked as a defence in the ICC, it is irrelevant, it doesn’t matter,” he said.

“I don’t care if millions of Filipinos will look at me as a villain.”

(This version of the story corrects paragraph 19 to show Sabio was lawyer for 20 years in Manila, not Cagayan de Oro)

Editing by Raju Gopalakrishnan

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